Outdoor project

Discussion in 'Toilet Forum discussions' started by troy1, May 12, 2010.

  1. troy1

    troy1 New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    louisiana
    Hopefully I can describe this project correctly and warrant some help. I have a cedar hut which is located next to my swimming pool. The building is to be used for changing, wash up and toilet. Presently the building has electrical power but no plumbing. It is elevated and does not appear to have many restrictions as to what I intend to do. I would like to install a toilet and a sink. I have a water line which is less than 30 feet away and it has a shutoff valve that will allow a tie in. The septic tank (for our residence) is approx 60 feet away. Running the water line looks fairly simple but the septic and drain part are out of my league. Could anyone tell me if a lift station would be needed for this toilet and is there any specific parts needed to tie in the sink drain to the same line that will go to the septic tank. In other words I would really appreciate anyone with knowledge of this type of work that could share some tips, advice etc. with me. Any help would be great! Thanks!
  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,832
    Location:
    New England
    If you can run the drain line so it has at least 1/4" per foot slope to the pipe going into the septic tank you can use gravity (preferred) to get the stuff there. You'll need to run a vent pipe up through the roof of the shed to vent the fixtures. The drain needs to be at least 3". The only gotcha might be if there is a minimum depth the pipe has to be burried...you may not have enough elevation to account for both that and the distance involved. 30' would be 7.5" of drop minimum. If it gets below freezing in the winter, you'll have to make some special provisions to keep the toilet from shattering.
  3. troy1

    troy1 New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    louisiana
    Thank you very much for the response. This gives me a starting point and should be easy enough to figure out what my options will be.
  4. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,310
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    But, since it's 60 feet to the septic you will need at least 15" drop for a gravity system.
  5. troy1

    troy1 New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    louisiana


    That is quite a drop. All I can do is measure and see where it falls. Are there any pressure systems that would work? I would like to avoid a lift station if possible. It's sort of a cost issue but not one of affordability but one of so much expense for a bathroom that will not be used very much.
  6. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,310
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    Just a "what if" idea. Since the septic is at a fixed level, what if you built the building higher with a couple of steps up into it? This would raise the outlet for the drains. Not knowing anything about your property, that is only a thought that popped into my head and may or may not be a doable thing.
  7. troy1

    troy1 New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    louisiana
    The building is elevated ( 1' 6" ) but I just measured the distance
    to the septic tank and it's 84' not 60'. I was guessing when I started this post and was not at home to double check. Looks like it's time to get a contractor and see if the elevation and distance would give me a 21" drop. I did read about toilets with pressure flushing systems so I will see if that could factor in as well. I appreciate the info and help. Once I get this resolved I will post a follow up in case anyone is curious about the solution.
  8. Peanut9199

    Peanut9199 Customer Service Manager Plumbing Wholesale

    Messages:
    875
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    You can also look a toilet with a macerating unit (pump behind the toilet) and it will pump the waste to the septic tank.
    http://www.saniflo.com/
  9. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,832
    Location:
    New England
    A pressure assisted toilet will still clog the line if you do not have the proper drop in the drain line. My preference is to avoid them, since they are more complex, and require more maintenance to continue to work. Plus, they are noisier. All the pressure assist does is evacuate the bowl in a different manner, it doesn't propel the waste down the drain line better - after a few feet, they both would be draining at the same rate...dictated by gravity and the slope.

    Also, if you could run the drain line to the existing one with enough slope to that point, it would be less digging. You don't necessarily need to make a 'home run' all the way to the tank...just depends on where the existing pipes are.
  10. troy1

    troy1 New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    louisiana

    Got it! So glad I found this forum. You guys are great! I will be doing some exploratory digging this weekend and will take all points into my planning. Thanks again!
  11. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,310
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    You're on the right track by getting a professional involved. Avoid pressure assist toilets. They are a gimmick to try and make poor performing toilets work properly. A good toilet, such as a Toto, will give the performance needed without a gimmick.
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