Outdoor faucet problem

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by mntentman, Aug 25, 2008.

  1. mntentman

    mntentman New Member

    Messages:
    68
    It seems to me that putting a garden hose on a faucet should be easy and foolproof... not much to not work correctly, right? So, I can't figure out exactly why mine doesn't work.

    A few years ago I had a sprinkler system installed, and this faucet seems soldered on via copper pipe. It least it doesn't look simple to get it off, or I would simply replace it. The problem is that garden hose is fairly difficult to get on (some stripped threads maybe?) and whenI do manage to get it on tightly via a wrench, it squirts water out the top of the faucet threads, or through whre the hose end is connected to the hose itself. I have tried several hoses, all do the same thing.

    This is not a complicated device! Is there some simple reason I am missing? And what can be done to fix it? Thanks much!
  2. Redwood

    Redwood Master Plumber

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    Location:
    Connecticut
    Inside of the female connector on the hose there should be one of these washers. The connector or the theads on the hose bibb may be bad.

    [​IMG]
  3. mntentman

    mntentman New Member

    Messages:
    68
    Thanks, Redwood... but the pic does not show. There are washers in both hoses I tried. (In fact I took them out just to see if they would take any difference.)

    If the threads are bad -- which could be the case since I can't get the hose very far up the threads, but it is hard to see the lower side of the threads -- do I have any choice but to replace? As I said, this is connected to a copper pipe and not something that looks like it would be easy to remove.

    (I can take a pic and post if it would help.)

    Thanks again.
  4. Redwood

    Redwood Master Plumber

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    I would suspect the hose threads are bad, they usually take a beating more so than the hose bibb. I'd pick up repair end and see how well it threads on the hose bibb. That should let you know whats bad any way and fix your hose as well if it is the problem.

    [​IMG]
  5. mntentman

    mntentman New Member

    Messages:
    68
    I'm one step ahead of you... I bought a package with different size connectors just to make sure the hoses I was trying to screw on were not the wrong size. They weren't, as I suspected, but I had the same problem getting the repair end on....

    Thanks for your help.
  6. Redwood

    Redwood Master Plumber

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    Time for a new sillcock! No Bout A Doubt It!:D
  7. mntentman

    mntentman New Member

    Messages:
    68
    That's what I was figuring, unfortunately. Now, given the way it is connected, one way to replace is obviously to cut off the old one, solder in a new one to the copper pip, right? I am not experienced with solder, nor have the equipment. I hear of folks connecting a new bibb with a compression nut instead of solder. Would you recommend that? Thanks.
  8. Redwood

    Redwood Master Plumber

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    Location:
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    Not my preference but sometimes done. Some people use sharkbites too,
    I really think the best option is to have a threaded adapter sweated onand then any time you need a hose bibb it will just thread on.
  9. mntentman

    mntentman New Member

    Messages:
    68
    What's the downside of the compression setup?

    I am not familiar with sharkbite...

    The threaded adapter makes sense... is that a DIY project?

    Thanks again.
  10. Redwood

    Redwood Master Plumber

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    Location:
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    The down side may come when you stretch that hose a little too far too hard.
    DIY the threaded adapter? Hows your pipe sweating skills?
  11. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

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    Location:
    New England
    If you are handy, with a little practice, you can do this. The tools necessary and a handfull of fittings to practice with should cost less than the plumber, then you would be ready for the next thing that needs to be repaired. This assumes you can afford the time. A plumber could probably do it in a few minutes, once things were prepared (it will take longer since there's up and down, inside and outside since you can't reach around the wall and be on both sides at once. It also will take a little time to get the old one off and the pipe cleaned up ready for the new one. The length may have to be adjusted a little to switch from a soldered to a threaded connection.

    There are lots of discussions about soldering here - try searching. A couple cardinal rules - clean everything inside and outside so it is shiney copper. Flux, and heat the fitting, not the pipe until the solder flows into the joint (don't heat the solder!). Wipe it afterwards to clean off any leftover flux and clean away any globs or drips (well, you can leave the globs and drips - shouldn't have any, but happens - you should clean off the flux, though).

    Easier, except maybe on the pocketbook, is to pay someone to do it for you.
  12. Southern Man

    Southern Man DIY Hillbilly

    Messages:
    530
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Some more bits of advice for sweating pipes:
    1. Make sure the pipe doesn't have water in it. If not you’ll boil water forever and never get the parts hot enough to melt the solder.
    2. Heat the pipe and fittings, not the solder. When you see the flux melt and flow into the joint then apply the solder to melt and follow it in.
    3. Use a big enough heat source. For a 1/2" pipe a standard propane torch does the trick.
    4. When sweating a valve take out the packing to avoid damaging the resilient parts. Since this is such a pain I usually buy a threaded fitting and sweat on a threaded adapter.
    5. Keep a spray bottle of water or wet rag around to extinguish fires! :eek:
  13. Redwood

    Redwood Master Plumber

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    I'll go one step further!
    I keep a fire extinguisher with me when I sweat pipe.
    I keep the extinguisher in my soldering kit right next to the torch.
    It would be a very bad day at work to have the fire department help me on the job!:cool:
  14. MACPLUMB 777

    MACPLUMB 777 TROJAN WORLDWIDE SALES RP

    Messages:
    679
    Location:
    Houston, Texas, United States
    Out Door Faucet Problem


    SO DO I;

    CARRY CO2 FIRE EXTINGUISER
  15. Redwood

    Redwood Master Plumber

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    Co2 has limited effectiveness on Class A fires.
    It does not have a Class A rating.
  16. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,647
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    hose

    Your faucet probably once had a backflow preventer which went bad. Rather than cut it off, some one unscrewed it, (with great difficulty), and destroyed the threads on the faucet. Your proper option is to replace the faucet. There may be other problems also because the hose seals with the washer so if it is tight it should NOT leak.
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