On the horizon -

Discussion in 'Water Softener Forum, problems, installation and r' started by Tom Sawyer, Sep 14, 2012.

  1. Tom Sawyer

    Tom Sawyer In the Trades

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    There is a major manufacturer of water filtration equipment that is just about ready to unveil a saltless water softener. Now we have seen varients along this idea for quite some time. Some work, some work a little and most are pure scams but this one's a bit different. From what I understand this unit is a hybrid of RO and exchange technologies. I did not say ion exchange for a reason and here it is. Basically, the unit uses two membranes made of different materials (which they won't tell me what for obvious reasons) Water comes in between these membranes and the membranes are electrically charged, positive and negative which depending on the polarity either attracts the minerals from the water (removal) or discharges the minerals from the membrane (backwash) the membranes also allow the filtered water to pass through when the exchange is completed.(RO) That's probably a very simplistic explanation but it's all I was able to weasel out of them. The upside is no more salt. The downside is about a 30% increase in waste water and a large increase in chlorides etc to the drain so I'm doubtfull that California will allow it. Still, very interesting stuff. Also of note is that Lancaster and Clack have come out with a couple of priority valves that have capabilities beyond the standard WS series. These valves allow a greater range of programming and diagnostic options while retaining the patented stack assembly. Also interesting is Lancaster/Clacks AquaNue Aeration filters that use the media tank as the retention tank. This eliminates the problems with plugged injectors and feed lines. Supposed to be the cats ass for H2S and Iron. Note the valve, that's a Clack on there.

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    Last edited: Sep 14, 2012
  2. Mikey

    Mikey Aspiring Old Fart, EE, computer & networking geek

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    I looked over Lancaster's website a bit, and noticed that for chlorination systems (look under "Chemical Feed Pumps"), they a) use a short swirly mixing tube after injection, b) chlorinate before the pressure tank, and c) have no contact/retention tank (other than the pressure tank). Makes for a nice compact system, but it seems to violate all the recommendations for chlorination contact time, and it looks like whatever precipitate there is winds up in the carbon filter. All in all, I'm skeptical. Also, there was lots of skepticism about the Vortech tanks a couple of years ago; do you have any experience with them?
  3. Tom Sawyer

    Tom Sawyer In the Trades

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    Limited but yes. I have installed probably around a dozen of them without any problems so far.
  4. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    If no sodium chloride or potassium chloride is being used (no ion exchange) how is there an increase in chloride content above what chloride is in the raw untreated water?

    How do you know that is a Clack valve?
  5. Tom Sawyer

    Tom Sawyer In the Trades

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    The first question I can't answer and I asked the same thing. The guys said chlorides to drain and I asked why there would be any chlorides and then he rambled off into talking about the membranes and how they are part RO which I'm guessing may scrub more from the water than ion exchange.

    The second one I can. I ran across this stuff at a trade show. The salesman from clack and Lancaster were both manning the booth. The valve I didn't show that Lancaster also has Clack make them is a WS look alike except that it too has greater programming and other features. I believe IIRC they called it a WS CS but I could be wrong. The other question I asked is whether that valve will be showing up on other equipment and It will for those companies that buy the license from Lancaster. Clack will not be directly distributing it to anyone else.
  6. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    All waters have a vary amount of chloride in them. It is supposed to be no more than 250 ppm in 'city' water although that is nonenforceable. Private well water varies greatly. I always tested for chloride.

    I'm not understanding what you're saying about a valve you didn't show... or a WS look alike. The one on the brochure looks like the Chinese knock off to me.

    See now ya shoulda stayed home instead of going to some show and getting all confused.
  7. Tom Sawyer

    Tom Sawyer In the Trades

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    I like going to trade shows, I get swag and other good stuff plus free dinner.

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