Nuclear plants in Japan risk meltdown

Discussion in 'Ian's Corner' started by Ian Gills, Mar 11, 2011.

  1. Cookie

    Cookie .

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    By Laura Zuckerman Laura Zuckerman – Sat Apr 2, 11:17 am ET

    SALMON, Idaho (Reuters) – While the nuclear crisis in Japan unfolds a continent away, Mormon-dominated communities in the western United States say the disaster overseas is bringing close to home a lesson about preparing for the worst.

    Emergency planning and the long-term storage of food, water and medical supplies are central practices by the 14 million worldwide members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

    The tradition stems from doctrine - "If ye are prepared ye shall not fear" - established by Joseph Smith when he founded the church in 1830 in upstate New York. It also stems from the persecution that drove his early followers from the Midwest to the Rocky Mountains in 1847.

    Present-day Mormons, concentrated in the United States in Utah, California and Idaho, say preparedness and self-reliance are a way of life and not signs of survivalist leanings or knee-jerk responses to disasters.

    "It's not a sudden, spectacular program," said Craig Rasmussen, spokesman for the church in Idaho, second only to Utah for the highest percentage of Mormons.

    Worries about radiation from Japan's crippled nuclear plants have spurred sales in the West of potassium iodide to block absorption of cancer-causing radioactive iodine even though U.S. officials say minor amounts detected in the air, rainwater or milk in 15 states pose no health risks.

    At a time of renewed interest in how to cope with calamity in a region where Mormonism is the prevailing religious, cultural and social influence, companies selling dehydrated, freeze-dried or canned foods in bulk are reporting rising sales.

    Don Pectol, vice president with Emergency Essentials Inc., a retail and online emergency supply chain based near Salt Lake City, said top sellers are powdered milk, water purifiers and meat processed to extend shelf life.

    'NORMAL BEHAVIOR'

    Pectol said the spike came after harmless levels of radiation were detected in states like Utah, Idaho and Arizona and the upsurge is similar to one that happened when Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in 2005.

    Another online seller of stored food said on its website that dried dairy products and powered eggs were temporarily unavailable.

    University of Colorado sociologist Kathleen Tierney, head of a national institute that tracks society's reactions to disasters, said potential nuclear threats place people on heightened alert.

    She said fears lessen with measures like stocking up on food or remedies because a sense of control replaces the feeling of helplessness.

    "It's normal behavior during uncertainty," said Tierney, director of the Natural Hazards Center in Boulder, Colorado.

    Mormon Mark Oliverson, a dentist and father of three in the remote mountain town of Salmon in central Idaho, said he and his wife routinely add and rotate items in the family's year-long supply of food. The couple also attends the church's workshops on emergency planning, food storage and other practices that make up so-called provident living.

    "It puts you in a position to take care of yourself and provide for your family through hard times - and that puts you in a good position to help others," he said.

    Church leaders say that principle allows it to respond to emergencies worldwide.

    In the aftermath of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, Mormon missionaries working in areas near Japan's stricken nuclear reactors were moved to safety.

    Officials said congregations in Japan have since set up an emergency response committee to organize volunteers distributing food, water, fuel and blankets.

    The hazard center's Tierney said models like that confirm studies that show "we are better people in disasters than in day-to-day situations."

    Eric Erickson, head of a group of Mormon congregations in the eastern Idaho community of Rexburg, where 90 percent of 24,000 residents are church members, said the crisis in Japan would likely prompt local leaders to fine-tune emergency plans and communications systems.

    "Katrina provided us the opportunity to re-look at things and revisit those principles; this will be another," he said.
  2. Redwood

    Redwood Master Plumber

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    Well it's good to know that you took the bait on the disappearing oil...

    BP plotted to influence what scientists say about oil spill’s impact, internal emails reveal

    With the first anniversary of the onset of the BP oil spill coming up next week, spill-weary Gulf natives have a fresh reminder of how the oil giant has devoted itself to studiously downplaying the damage of the disaster: A recently leaked body of internal company correspondence shows senior BP brass trying to spin scientific research produced by company-paid researchers in order to minimize the scale of the spill's destruction in the public mind.
    The news doesn't exactly come as a shock to many in the Gulf region. After all, when the Mobile Press-Register first reported last summer that BP was contracting to hire a battery of coastal scientists, many theorized that some such initiative was afoot. And now the internal BP emails obtained by Greenpeace through the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) appear to bear such worries out.
    As The Guardian reports today, BP officials sought to tailor the findings of company-funded research. Last May, BP announced that it was ponying up $500 million to fund "an open research program studying the impact of the Deepwater Horizon incident." That mega-project is now known as the Gulf of Mexico Research Institute (GRI). And to judge by the emails released via Greenpeace, company leaders were deeply concerned with how to spin to the group's findings given they footed its research bills.
    "Can we 'direct' GRI funding to a specific study (as we now see the governor's offices trying to do)," BP environmental official Russell Putt asked in a June 2010 email. "What influence do we have over the vessels/equipment driving the studies vs the questions?"
    Another email written by a BP environmental officer, Karen Ragoonanan-Jalim, indicates that company officials met in Houma, Louisiana, to discuss how they might "steer the research" to best serve the oil company's interests, writing that officials discussed how "BP can influence this long-term research programme" to "undertake the studies we believe will be useful."
    The emails also reveal dissension among U.S. government leaders over the spill, specifically over the White House's controversial, and ultimately disproved, claims that the "vast majority" of the spilled oil had vanished from the Gulf.
    Reports the Guardian's Suzanne Goldenberg:
    The White House clashed with officials from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) last summer when drafting the administration's account of what has happened to the spilled oil.
    On 4 August, Jane Lubchenco, the NOAA administrator, demanded that the White House issue a correction after it claimed that the "vast majority" of BP oil was gone from the Gulf.
    A few days earlier, Lisa Jackson, the head of the EPA, and her deputy, Bob Perciasepe, had also objected to the White House estimates of the amount of oil dispersed in the gulf. "These calculations are extremely rough estimates yet when they are put into the press, which we want to happen, they will take on a life of their own," Perciasepe wrote.
    It should be noted that no evidence has yet surfaced to suggest that BP succeeded in compromising the integrity of the research carried out by any of the scientists working with the GCI.
    http://news.yahoo.com/s/yblog_thelookout/20110415/ts_yblog_thelookout/bp-plotted-to-influence-what-scientists-say-about-oil-spills-impact-internal-emails-reveal
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2011
  3. Tom Sawyer

    Tom Sawyer In the Trades

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    We don't have to worry about what the EPA has to say anymore. The tea party wants to get rid of them too.
  4. Cookie

    Cookie .

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    This all should be a wake-up call...

    Fri Apr 15, 11:16 pm ET
    TOKYO (AFP) – A strong earthquake of magnitude 5.8 hit central Japan on Saturday morning, according to the US Geological Survey.

    The quake, which shook buildings in Tokyo, struck at 11:19 am (0219 GMT), 83 kilometres (52 miles) north of the capital and at a depth of 20 kilometres, the USGS said.

    Operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) said the tremor did not disrupt the emergency crews who are working around the clock to cool crippled reactors at a nuclear plant hit by a devastating earthquake and tsunami last month.

    That earthquake -- the biggest ever recorded in Japan -- struck on March 11, triggering a huge tsunami and leaving 13,591 people dead, with another 14,497 still unaccounted for.

    Tens of thousands of people lost their homes, while many others were forced to evacuate after a series of explosions at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant sent radiation spewing into the air.

    The radiation leaks have resulted in bans on produce from the affected area and hurt the fishing and farming industries because of public fears over radioactivity in food.

    On Friday, Japan's government ordered TEPCO to offer payouts to tens of thousands of people made homeless by the ongoing crisis.

    The total cost from collapsed or damaged houses, factories and infrastructure such as roads and bridges is estimated to reach 16-25 trillion yen over the next three fiscal years, according to the Cabinet Office.

    There were no immediate reports of any damage or casualties from Saturday's quake, which the Japan Meteorological Agency said had a magnitude of 5.9 and struck at a depth of 70 kilometres underground.
  5. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

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    I think we could all chip in and buy Ian a one way ticket to Japan to do some cleanup work at the plants!
  6. Cookie

    Cookie .

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    One thing, at least I haven't heard much about is disease. Which can be easily transported.
  7. Cookie

    Cookie .

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  8. Redwood

    Redwood Master Plumber

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    Where Do I Send My Donation?
  9. Ian Gills

    Ian Gills Senior Robin Hood Guy

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    With the equipment and the entitlements you get as a US serviceman, it wouldn't take much persuading.

    You never see a poor US veteran.

    It's all there. And we can thank the Government for it.

    Just imagine a country where every citizen got the same benefits as US veterans.

    http://www.vba.va.gov/pubs/forms/VBA-21-0501-ARE.pdf

    Kinda makes you want to sign up, doesn't it? I'm sure a few of the rest of us would like some help with home loans and education grants too.

    [​IMG]
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2011
  10. Cookie

    Cookie .

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    If you can find any WW2 Vets, why don't you ask them what they get per month right now? Especially, those who are collecting a disablility pay from being injured overseas. My poor dad, was getting , ( better sit down Ian) $55.00 a month for having the privledge of getting blown-up, losing his hearing for life, and like he would say, " and then some." I guess, I am lucky I was created. He hardly made a killing from being in the service; and, so far as using the freebies, such as the GI bill of rights for housing, he never used it. He never bought a house. You never saw a poor veteran? Ha. Like I was told from age 13 from teachers, " put yer glasses on."
  11. Ian Gills

    Ian Gills Senior Robin Hood Guy

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    I'm just saying that America looks after its vets.

    They all seem to have great health care (provided by the Feds) and most of the retired ones I see are either riding around on large motorbikes or driving around in big trucks.

    The young ones go to great universities after leaving.

    America really puts its hand in its pockets for its retired servicemen. No expense is spared.

    You should all be proud of this. It's the right thing to do.

    But when it comes to ordinary people, some start questioning the role of the Government to provide similar services.

    Why?

    So what is good for the goose, isn't good for the gander in this country.

    Why are Government entitlements OK for vets but not for retired people of other trades?

    And why don't vets have to look after themselves like the rest of us?

    In England you get special benefits if you are injured in active combat.

    In America, all you have to do is serve and then you're entitled. It appears you do not even have to go to war to get the vets benefits here, let alone be injured.

    But a poor retired plumber or teacher is on his/her own.
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2011
  12. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

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    If you think the VA is so wonderful, I do encourage you to sign up. The vast majority of the millions and millions of Americans who have served in the Armed Forces get zilch bubkis from the VA. The GI bill....you pay into that while you are on active duty. If you get shot up, or agent oranged, or some strange bug in Iraq, MOST former servicement DIE before they finally get the VA to recognize their illness as service-related. If you are lucky enough to work your way up the ranks, and stay for 20+ years, you do earn a pension. I can tell you that the pension after 22½ years service is 30 % of what you were making at the time you retire. Nice to have but not exactly a princely sum. The medical insurance ( TRICARE) is nice, and the price is very reasonable, but under constant pressure from congress to increase the annual fee and the copays and dedictibles. All of this is fair payment in return for sucking freon, amine, and carbon monoxide for 20 years,.
  13. Ian Gills

    Ian Gills Senior Robin Hood Guy

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    Just like in England then. Where to get a "war pension" (which can run to $2400 a month) vets often have to go to court to prove their injuries were service-related.
    Which is tricky when you are exposed to chemical weapons.

    I wonder why servicemen and women do not speak out more? Unlike in England, they (and their families) are very well organised politically in the US.
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2011
  14. Cookie

    Cookie .

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    I know a Vet, who was sprayed with Agent Orange, his 2 daughters was born without ear drums. The "special" allowances made wasn't that great. It paid for the School for the deaf for his girls.
  15. ballvalve

    ballvalve General Engineering Contractor

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    Those gentleman LIVE on their bikes. They winter over in central Nevada in rented 5th wheels and 1962 mobile homes.
  16. Ian Gills

    Ian Gills Senior Robin Hood Guy

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    So, we're back to square one.

    If America doesn't even look after its vets, just who does it look out for?

    Not the poor. Not the sick. Not the elderly.

    Nada.

    Less a country. More of a "place". Certainly no longer fit to be part of the Kingdom.
  17. Cookie

    Cookie .

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    I wish I would had copied what I read the other day about where out tax dollars goes to, but, one of them was national defense. That was the second one. Since, I am brain damaged, I can't remember the first, lol. Another was foreign aide. I can't remember the percentage on that either, but, this one wasn't high up, but not the last either. If I can find it, I will post the chart for you, Ian.
  18. ballvalve

    ballvalve General Engineering Contractor

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    That wasnt really a cut. They like that life. The UK will never have a Nevada to winter over in, nor enough lonely roads, as in Kansas, to truly feel the wind of freedom in your face.

    If they get sick, a VA hospital is always near.

    Just try and pull over on a BLM road in the UK and target practice with your array of guns. Thats what they joined up to protect. And to make sure we never have a KINGdom again.

    Stop in here- 'Mina, Nevada' for a real taste of another world.

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&...=1&q=photos of mina nevada&aq=f&aqi=&aql=&oq=

    http://www.city-data.com/city/Mina-Nevada.html

    This is the best one on Mina:

    http://www.mentalfloss.com/blogs/archives/38121

    Now Ian, if you really take a look at these photos, and actually get there one day, you will start to understand the absolutely bizzare nature of the American west.

    You might also want to read Henry Millers ' The air conditioned nightmare' - one of the last great Americans.
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2011
  19. Neanderthal Man

    Neanderthal Man The Cave Man

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    Bro I can't believe the stuff you are pretending to know.
    Why are you pretending tp be an engineer?
    We all watched you get expelled from the college.
  20. ballvalve

    ballvalve General Engineering Contractor

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    If you cro-mags could read, and think outside of your next skunk dinner, you would know not to put your backup power in front of the wave.

    Had they built the plant in a cave up in the mountains, on springs, japan would just have water to clean up.

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