Notching studs?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by Riceman98, Mar 29, 2013.

  1. Riceman98

    Riceman98 New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Boise, ID
    Hey guys I'm new here with a couple questions. I am converting my single sink vanity to a double sink. I know how I need to running the plumbing. In the picture you can see there is a wall that runs perpendicular to the wall I need to run the plumbing in. The stud on the end sticks into the wall about 1 1/2". Should I notch the stud at the end of the wall? I'm kind of at a loss as what to do. :confused: Thanks!

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    IMG_0369.jpg
  2. Winslow

    Winslow Plumber

    Messages:
    450
    Location:
    Hawaii
    It's only a nailer for the drywall, run a cup saw through it leaving as much as possible. How did you intend on turning this into a double vanity, you can put only 1 trap on a trap arm. You need to either cut in a san tee underneath, run over to within 42 inches of the other sink then revent or cut the line move it over to within 42" and then put a figure (5)fitting.
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2013
  3. Riceman98

    Riceman98 New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Boise, ID
    I plan on cutting in a San tee under the current drain and reventing. The 42" thing has thrown me off. Can the new drain only be 42" from the stack? Or the drains can be no more than 42" apart? The new drain will be about 56" from the stack. The drains will only be about 30" apart.
  4. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,246
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    You can cut in a second sanitary tee, but the new trap arm will need to be re-vented because it's trap will be too far from the stack.
  5. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
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    Location:
    New England
    Back to basics...each drain needs a vent and each drain needs a trap. You can combine vent lines, but there are rules. You need to install the vent before the drain line (trap arm) out of the trap turns down, otherwise, you'll create an S-trap. The trap arm can only be so long (depends on the pipe diameter) before it must be vented. The 42" is a vertical height ABOVE the floor OR 6" above the flood plane of the thing you are venting, whichever is HIGHER). That number comes from a typical kitchen counter, which is 36" above the floor, then add 6" for good measure. The idea is to keep the vent free of waste - since the waste is governed by gravity, 6" gives a little leeway in case you have a pump on the inlet (say a garbage disposer, dishwasher, washing machine, etc.). You can add as many things to a drain line as you want, as long as the size is adequate and each thing is vented properly. There are practical limits based on the size of the fittings, but there can be many things run into it.
  6. Riceman98

    Riceman98 New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Boise, ID
    Jadnashua,
    I have my dad helping, who is a licensed plumber, I have the plumbing down so it is up to code. But Winslow said the drains can't be more than 42" apart. I was just trying to clarify. The second drain will be about 56" away from the stack. My dad has not heard of any code about how far the drains are apart. I have read through most of the code and can't fine anything. As long as the slope on the drain is correct it doesn't matter how long the waste pipe is. Am I wrong?
  7. wjcandee

    wjcandee Wise One

    Messages:
    1,853
    Location:
    New York, NY
    Winslow is saying that the maximum horizontal distance of a trap arm on 1.5" pipe is 3.5 feet, which is 42". Each trap arm can have only one trap, so each has to be within 42" of the vent.

    Put differently, the trap-to-vent distance on 1.5" pipe is minimum 3" (calculated as 2 pipe diameters), maximum 42".

    If it makes a difference, the distance on this kind of trap arm is measured from the weir of the trap to the inner edge of the vent.
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2013
  8. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    You are misunderstanding Winslow, as he was referring to the distance allowed between the trap and it's vent.
    The problem is that depending on where we are, we don't all fall under the same plumbing code.

    Idaho is a UPC state.

    UPCvents.jpg
  9. wjcandee

    wjcandee Wise One

    Messages:
    1,853
    Location:
    New York, NY
    (Okay, realize Cacher Chick wasn't talking to me.)

    Put another way, he wasn't talking about how far the drain can be from the stack, he was talking about how far the trap can be from the vent ("trap arm"). The stack can be wherever it is, but you need a vent within 42" of the trap.
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2013
  10. Riceman98

    Riceman98 New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Boise, ID
    Ok guys that makes more sense. I don't think think this applies to what I'm doing. I plan on doing something like this:
    image.jpg
  11. wjcandee

    wjcandee Wise One

    Messages:
    1,853
    Location:
    New York, NY
    Yep. I, at least, think you got it. Looks almost exactly like Bert Polk's example of how to do "two lavatory sinks side by side with single drain".
  12. Riceman98

    Riceman98 New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Boise, ID
    Thanks guys got the new drain plumbed up!

    image.jpg
  13. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,015
    Location:
    New England
    Do all of the horizontal runs have the appropriate minimum of 1/4" per foot slope? Hard to tell from the picture. To my unprofessional opinion, it should work
  14. Riceman98

    Riceman98 New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Boise, ID
    Yes they do! ;)
  15. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,246
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    Thumbs up!

    While you are in there, put another electrical receptacle on the other side of the new cabinet, so that they are spaced evenly over opposite sides of the sinks. You also need to make sure the receptacles have GFCI protection. :p
  16. Riceman98

    Riceman98 New Member

    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Boise, ID
    How do I test the drains? Can I just pour water down the drain and check for leaks?
  17. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,246
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    The proper way would be to cap the drains and install a test tee in the stack so that the line can be blocked with a test ball, and then the stack filled with water from the top. The standard test is 10 feet of head pressure on the line.

    With a small job like yours, most would not go through the trouble unless they had to for an inspection.
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