Noma fan forced wall heater 240v

Discussion in 'Electrical Forum discussion & Blog' started by Stevec1234, Mar 12, 2011.

  1. Stevec1234

    Stevec1234 New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Victoria, BC Canada
    Hello, I have a 200 amp Westinghouse main panel, I've installed a 60 amp breaker and ran 6/3 wire to a stab lok sub panel, which will power a small suite. I installed a Noma fan forced wall heater 240v from a 20 amp 2 pole breaker and used 12/2 wire to the heaters. When I energized the sub the heater did not work, the lights plugs etc did. I then checked for power at the heater and had 119v at each leg, I then disconnected a baseboard heater 240v in another room and connected the noma heater and it worked. Thinking it could be my wiring connections I disconnected the wires of the double 20 amp in the sub and connected them to a double 20 in the main and it worked. Then I figured that maybe I had the wrong breaker in the sub so I connected the wired to a double 30 in the sub still didn't work. I then checked for voltage at the legs coming into the sub and found I had 119v there. So is this the wrong sub panel for 240v or what I'm stumped, would appreciate any help.
  2. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,246
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    It sounds like both of your feeds are coming off the same buss bar instead of one from each leg.
    I have not seen your panels, so will refrain from saying anything more.
  3. jwelectric

    jwelectric Electrical Contractor/Instructor

    Messages:
    2,534
    Location:
    North Carolina
    119 volts is well within the limits and should not be a problem. check out everything at the heater connection to ensure a good connection

    Also it is a good idea to use a solenoid or analog voltage tester instead of a digital as first two will test the voltage under a load instead of no load as done with a digital meter
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2011
  4. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,013
    Location:
    New England
    That's a good reading for hot to neutral or ground. What do you get between the hot-hot? If, for some reason, the box and the breaker you have are not designed for each other, both legs could be on the same side, so hot-hot would read zero (or very close), and there'd be no current flow; the two leads must be on opposite poles to get 240vac between them. Normally, the breaker would only fit where it would give you 240vac, often because there's a slot in the back. You might just try it by shifting down one slot.
  5. jwelectric

    jwelectric Electrical Contractor/Instructor

    Messages:
    2,534
    Location:
    North Carolina
    After reading Jim’s post I decided to revisit the original post for a closer look.

    In your original post you mentioned that you fed the remote panel with 6/3. I am assuming that this is two hots, one neutral, and an equipment grounding conductor.

    You also state that you checked the voltages of each leg and again I am assuming this is from both hots to ground or the neutral.

    What you didn’t post was the voltage between the two hots. Please do so.
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