no glue abs connection

Discussion in 'Shower & Bathtub Forum & Blog' started by nilesh1540, Jul 2, 2008.

  1. nilesh1540

    nilesh1540 New Member

    Messages:
    3
    i had a handyman do some repair work on my house tub and I did not see him use any abs glue on the new fittings. he indicated to me that the system is not under pressure and that the fittings snugly fit into each other. i am not a plumber and i didn't know who would know this. any help. please.
  2. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

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    27,062
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    ?

    Your fourth word, "handyman", tells the story. It MAY not leak because it is under minimal pressure, but it can also fall off if something displaces it. One of Murphy's Laws says that if a homeowner or handyman takes a shortcut it will not leak immediately, but if a professional plumber tried to do the same thing, it would start leaking before he could get his head out of the cabinet.
  3. patrick88

    patrick88 Plumber

    Messages:
    836
    Location:
    Webster Ma.
    What type of fittings are they. If they are glue fittings they will leek. If they are slip nut and gasket fittings you will be ok. Taking a pic of the area in question will help.
  4. nilesh1540

    nilesh1540 New Member

    Messages:
    3
    thanks hj.

    they are abs 1.5 inch piping.

    the strainer (where the water goes down the drain) is called the waste and the the other part is called the overflow. that's why its called waste and overflow kit.

    the waste is connected to a piece of pipe about 8-10- inches where it connects into a slightly turned T Union going down.

    the part from the overflow also connects into this T and that water would go straight down.

    because it is not under pressure it is probably not going to leak but my concern is that some drops of water may come out when it is being used. and if that happens is that a big concern. i'm thinking that those drops are eventually gonna dry out also.

    i'm not sure.

    the last thing i wanna do is tear everything back out.

    is there anything like something you can pour down the drain so that anything where it can leak would get sealed with clogging the drains.

    let me know what you know thanks.
  5. Redwood

    Redwood Master Plumber

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    7,450
    Location:
    Connecticut
    It may or, may not require gluing. Can you post a picture?

    :eek:Handyman Plumbing?:eek:
  6. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,062
    Location:
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    pipe

    If it is the tub's waste and overflow then it WILL BE under pressure while the tub is draining and it WILL LEAK then.
  7. Plumber Jim

    Plumber Jim Member

    Messages:
    92
    No offense, If it was standard glue abs fittings not slip joints then that handyman needs a good pipe over the head. tell that hanyman hack that he needs to leave the plumbing to plumbers. I know that not all handymen are that stupid but if that was glue type fittings and he didn'y glue them then he is a complete moron.
  8. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,387
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    I agree with Plumber Jim. ABS, PVC, or copper joints have to be properly connected. Plastic is solvent welded, copper is soldered. Granted that a drain line is not subjected to high pressure, but if the joints are not sealed, they will leak and they can come apart. The water may not spray all over as they would in a pressurized situation, but a little leak is like a little PG except it won't go away in 9 months.:D A beginner might think that as tight as plastic fittings and pipe go together dry, they would not leak, but that just isn't true. It's guys like your handyman that make code inspectors really necessary.
  9. Redwood

    Redwood Master Plumber

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    Location:
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    If this is what he installed it would go in without being glued.
    I would not install this type but a handyman I'm sure would!

    [​IMG]

    Anything after the part pictured above should be glued.

    The waste and overflow pictured below is what I would use.

    [​IMG]
  10. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    The handyman in question is neither stupid nor moronic. Such a person would be incapable of even considering the matter of possible leaking, and a pipe (either a good one or a bad one) over the head would not resolve that kind of problem.

    Slip-joint assemblies do not need glue (cement) to prevent leaking, but other parts almost always do.

    Because of the tight fit and the actual orientation of the parts, I have a toilet flange glued (cemented) to a piece of pipe that is merely slipped into a coupling cast into a concrete floor. Unless my entire septic system backs up to ground level, there is no possibility for leaking. But if I ever need to replace that flange, the job will be a very simple one.
  11. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,062
    Location:
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    flange

    Because of the tight fit and the actual orientation of the parts, I have a toilet flange glued (cemented) to a piece of pipe that is merely slipped into a coupling cast into a concrete floor.

    That may also qualify as a handyman fix. If done correctly and the right part used it should not need to be removed some time in the future.
  12. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    It was not a fix at all. It was a new installation in the new floor of my new workshop.

    The job was done correctly, the right parts were used and there was simply no need to glue the bottom end of the vertical pipe going into the hub below ... and now a repair will be easy if anybody ever breaks the plastic flange.
  13. Redwood

    Redwood Master Plumber

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    Thats just it! A plastic flange is not the right part!
    A plastic flange with a stainless steel ring would have been the right part!
  14. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    Okay, if you insist. I have never liked plastic flanges anyway ... but neither have I ever seen a flange with a stainless ring ... so at least that leaves some of us DIYers and handymen just a bit ignorant rather than actually stupid or moronic, eh?!
  15. Redwood

    Redwood Master Plumber

    Messages:
    7,450
    Location:
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    Lowes has them!
    http://www.oatey.com/Plumber/Shared/ProductGroupDetail/716/Closet+Flanges+with+Stainless+Steel+Rings.html
    http://www.oatey.com/Plumber/Shared/ProductGroupDetail/717/Easy+Tap+TM+Closet+Flange.html
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2008
  16. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,062
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    pipes

    The job was done correctly, the right parts were used and there was simply no need to glue the bottom end of the vertical pipe going into the hub below ... and now a repair will be easy if anybody ever breaks the plastic

    Using that logic, there would never be any reason to glue the top joints of ANY fittings because the water would never create any pressure on them. In this area, YOUR joint WOULD have to have been in place during the water pressure test, and it WOULD have leaked and WOULD have been rejected. Anyone who uses a plastic flange is setting themselves up for a future repair, but that is not justification for making an improper connection, and if it was not cemented it was NOT done correctly, and it was a handyman job.
  17. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    That might seem like a logical conclusion in your mind, but not in mine. The fitting in question here is in the ground and outside the foundation of the house. Even though I know it cannot possibly ever leak a drop unless my entire septic system backs up to ground level, I would never have left that joint dry anywhere else.

    There are some related things to consider here. The toilet that sits on that flange has a porcelain bowl on a plastic base, and now the plastic flange is the easy-to-repair "weak link" in that particular installation. If something gets broken, the flange will be first and the toilet will thus be protected.

    Fortunately, and especially since I have no license to lose, I can employ a little practicality and even a bit of figure-it-out common sense at will!
  18. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,062
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Oh, yeah

    1. If it is installed properly the toilet does not contact the flange so it will not break it.
    2. With the right flange there is no reason to EVER have to redo it.
    3. If the connection is "outside" the foundation, then that must mean the toilet is outside the building.
    4. Every handyman who ever picked up a tool feels that his "shortcuts" are really practical solutions. And most of them do not have licenses that they can lose either.
  19. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    If a toilet gets bumped hard or pushed over or whatever, it would not have to be in contact with the flange in order for the bolts to break either the flange or the base of the toilet ... and I would rather have the flange break than the toilet.

    Sure ... but in this case, a steel flange could not help to protect the toilet from situational damage.

    The toilet is in my new workshop that is outside the foundation of the house.

    You bet!
  20. Redwood

    Redwood Master Plumber

    Messages:
    7,450
    Location:
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    Lee, Its a hack job plain and simple and there is nothing that can justify it!

    So why not just call it a day?
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