newbie needs help pumping uphill to house

Discussion in 'Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog' started by tazman632000, May 30, 2014.

  1. tazman632000

    tazman632000 New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Colorado
    this is what i have got a 1hp submersible pump set in the 4 inch well at about 100 feet i then have 1 inch pvc schedule 40 run 1300/1400 feet with a elevation rise uphill about of about 160/170 feet to my house that i just put in. i ve had to adjust the pressure valve to about 130 psi just to get water to flow out of the pipe at the house with very little pressure. so my question is what it the best system to use, should i get a higher hp pump for the well or should i pump it to a cistern type storage with float valve at the house with a say 1/2hp pump for the house system? could i just hook up the 1/2 hp pump to the line coming up the hill in the house then to a pressure tank for the house supply. i would like a very good gpm/ pressure flow at the house so i want to do what would be the simplest way to accomplish this. i have 2 100 gallon wellmate fiberglass tanks i can use for storage but not quite sure how to plumb them to a float inlet type cistern system. they inlets in both the top and bottom. thanks for any help in advance.
  2. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,468
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    Considering your well depth, elevation, and friction loss, a 1HP, 10 GPM pump would be doing good to give you 6 GPM at about 30 PSI to the house. If you increase the volume to about 10 GPM, you will have 30 PSI friction loss, need 75 PSI for the elevation, then you need at least another 50 PSI when it gets to the house. Added up that would mean you need a minimum of 155 PSI at the pressure switch. A pressure switch setting of 155/175 would give you good pressure at the house. This also means that you would need a 1.5 HP, 10 GPM pump, as your 1HP cannot build this much pressure. It would also mean you need a pressure tank with a rating of at least 175 PSI. And because of the high pressure, you would need a fairly large tank, as they don’t hold much water at those high pressures.

    Much of this is friction loss from the long line of 1” pipe. You will have 50 PSI at the house when using 10 GPM. But when not using any water or maybe just 3 GPM for a single shower, there is little to no friction loss and you will have an additional 30 PSI, which would be 80 PSI in the house. If the extremes of 50 to 80 PSI in the house are more than you want, just put a pressure-reducing valve at the house set at 50 PSI, and you will have a steady 50 PSI, no matter the demand at the house.

    Your existing 1HP pump could easily feed a cistern type storage tank at the top of the hill. Then you could add a booster pump in the cistern to deliver as much pressure and volume to the house as you want. Because of the cost of a 175 PSI rated tank, this cistern set up maybe your best way to go. Both methods have benefits and disadvantages. You just have to weigh out the best for you.
  3. tazman632000

    tazman632000 New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Colorado
    thanks for the reply have decided to go with the cistern type system as if i have a power outage it will be easier for me to power the house location and not both as the well as its on a different meter. is there a diagram available to help me plumb the cistern system with the float valve and pump pulling off the cistern tank being supplied by the lower well?
  4. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,468
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    Low yield well with cistern and jet pump.
    [​IMG]

    Low yield well with cistern and sub booster.
    [​IMG]
  5. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,468
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    And if you can't run wires for a float switch between the cistern and well, you can hook it up like this. You just won't need the extra line "going to irrigation".

    Well pump and cistern booster with Pside-Kick.
    [​IMG]
  6. craigpump

    craigpump Member

    Messages:
    944
    Location:
    ct
    Where's the power supply for the 1 hp pump? Is it a single phase pump? If its at the house you're going to need #6 cable unless its a 3phase pump, then you can use #10
  7. tazman632000

    tazman632000 New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Colorado
    the last diagram did not show up, i can not run a float switch wire to the well pump its to far and difficult. i had major task just getting the pipe connected, how about just putting a solenoid valve on the inlet line right at the tank using the float switch? a while back i also say a guy using some type of toilet valve rigged in a five gallon bucket, not sure it would allow much flow though. another problem (not sure) is that the storage tank /cistern would need to be open to the atmosphere correct? i dont see that on the diagrams. how would you keep it open to the atmosphere and sanitary? thanks again for the help
  8. tazman632000

    tazman632000 New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Colorado
    the llast post diagram is showing up now thanks
  9. craigpump

    craigpump Member

    Messages:
    944
    Location:
    ct
    You have to be able to turn the pump om & off somehow. Just allowing the pump to run deadhead against a solenoid will wipeout the pump, melt it off the drop pipe or burst a pipe to say nothing about your elect bill.
  10. tazman632000

    tazman632000 New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Colorado
    i have a 50 gallon bladder tank at the well site.
  11. LLigetfa

    LLigetfa DIYer, not in the trades

    Messages:
    3,989
    Location:
    NW Ontario, Canada
    He has a pressure switch set to 130 PSI kick-in. Not sure how much the pump will go above that to actually kick-out. Might be prudent to add a Cycle Sensor.
  12. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,468
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    I think a pressure setting of 110/130 will get water to the cistern. If the well pump cycles on and off while filling the cistern, a CSV can hold a steady 120 PSI and keep the friction loss from causing the pump to cycle.
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