New Installation Upstairs

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by Pavesa, Apr 29, 2014.

  1. Pavesa

    Pavesa New Member

    Messages:
    10
    Location:
    Nova Scotia
    Hi

    I live in an old house and I'm just finishing off installation of an upstairs bathroom, to date, there's been no water upstairs, everything is downstairs including the current bathroom, with water fed up from the basement. I've been able to connect the upstairs cold to a pipe that connects direct to the main as it comes into the building and I'm looking for advise on where to connect the hot. Issues I'm concerned about having too long a run from the hot water tank so it takes ages to get warm water upstairs and is wasteful of heat and also concerned not to lose pressure upstairs if someone turns on a hot tap downstairs (most importantly for safety, I think I avoid this by having the cold directly connected to the main). I'm sure there's a standard way of going about this. My initial thought is to connect directly to the pipe that comes off the hot water tank but I'm pretty much a novice so it would be helpful to have a few leads on this. I'm using PEX.

    Thanks for any thoughts...
  2. Pavesa

    Pavesa New Member

    Messages:
    10
    Location:
    Nova Scotia
    Hi

    reading through my post again, I think there's a bit of ambiguity about my concern about loss of pressure. Having the cold lose pressure is more dangerous because the shower runs hot but I think I avoid this by having the cold connected directly to the main. My concern is about the hot because turning on a hot tap downstairs may cause loss of pressure. My thought is connecting to the hot water tank directly may avoid this.

    Thanks for any thoughts..
  3. MaxWarp

    MaxWarp New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Location:
    IL
    Well, I did a 2nd floor bathroom from scratch. It wasn't the first 2nd floor bathroom but rather the 2nd. My first bathroom takes forever to get warm water via copper pipes. The 2nd bathroom that I installed from scratch is done with PEX. I installed a manifold in the basement directly off the hot water and the cold line. (my plan is to use that manifold for the basement bathroom too) Ran the PEX up to the 2nd floor from the manifold for both cold/hot and I've had far better luck with quick hot water and no pressure issues with the cold or hot. Because the PEX manifold is the "closest" to the source and everything else in the house is after that manifold that bathroom wins. I never have a variance in cold or hot. I hope that helps.
  4. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,481
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    quote; Having the cold lose pressure is more dangerous because the shower runs hot

    Your tub or shower valve MUST be pressure balanced, therefore a drop in EITHER the hot or cold pressure will not be a problem. IF the pipe size where you connect is adequate, and we are not there to tell if it is or not, and your pipe sizes are adequate, you will not have a noticeable change in pressure. But, your error could be in assuming the line INTO the house is adequate, but if it is not, then even connecting at that point might not prevent a problem.
    Last edited: May 3, 2014
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