Natural Gas Supply Line

Discussion in 'Remodel Forum & Blog' started by robojet, Oct 7, 2005.

  1. robojet

    robojet New Member

    Messages:
    14
    Location:
    So. Cal.
    I'm remodeling the kitchen and would like to address a issue with the existing gas supply line to the cooktop. Currently it sticks out way to far and I would like to shorten it. The part of the pipe that needs to be changed (something like a 6-8" to a 4" with an elbow), is on the otherside of the shutoff valve.

    I've seen people do this type of work without even shutting off the gas... not sure I want to take this approach :eek: , but, hey... I wouldn't mind some suggestions. I always thought that if you turned off the gas, you had to call the gas company to have it turned back on - so this could be a pain (if I have my facts straight). Or maybe I shouldn't touch this at all --- is this something a plumber does? Or is it another trade?

    Any advice on doing this myself (or not) is appreciated... I've done gas connections before, but I've always had a shutoff valve between me and supply line.

    Thanks!
  2. finnegan

    finnegan New Member

    Messages:
    250
    Location:
    CT
    I, and everyone else, am going to encourage you to not be too adventurous with your gas lines. There probably are some folks out there who work on gas lines without turning off the main, but you should not follow in their footsteps. I cannot say what your local utilities require, but in NJ you can certainly shut off your gas supply in your house (at the meter) without notifying the utility company. However, depending upon the work you want to do, it may require an inspection from your local building department. With that being said, I expect many people would probably not get a permit for minor work.

    As far as doing the work, I am not sure I understand your goal. I think you want to shorten the stub coming our from the wall. The problem in doing this yourself is that you will be banging the pipes around a bit and you could possibly cause a joint you are not working on to fail. Without pressure testing the pipes you would never know about the leak until it was too late.
  3. chassis

    chassis Engineer

    Messages:
    339
    Location:
    SE Pennsylvania
    The safest route is to call a contractor. Check in the yellow pages under either plumbers or furnace/heating people. It will say in the advertisements what type of services they provide.
  4. Kristi

    Kristi Tradesman Plumber

    Messages:
    176
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    Or... call a Gas Contractor/Fitter! In the yellow pages... :)
  5. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,328
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    Gas meter is easily turned on/off with an adjustable wrench. (They make special ones, but not really necessary) It takes 1/4 turn...no more or the gas is back on. Do not even think about working on gas lines without turning the gas off, that's insane. Also, unless you've got some experience with plumbing with threaded pipe, you would be wise to have a qualified person on the job. A little water leak is a PITA, but a little gas leak can be fatal.
  6. robojet

    robojet New Member

    Messages:
    14
    Location:
    So. Cal.
    OK... I will not do this myself. I will either leave as is or get a qualified professional. I do appreciate the feedback.

    Someone asked about what my goal was... well, the current problem is that the pipe sticks out straight from the wall several inches and sits in an area where pots/pans are stored. Because it sticks out so much, it can easily get 'banged' around when putting away pots/pans and also takes up valuable storage space. I just wanted to solve these problems by shortening the stub and putting an elbow in it to redirect the line to the cooktop.

    Thanks!
  7. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    The people who try to do a "quickie" on a gas job sooner or later end up on the six o'clock news under the headline "gas explosion flattens house". Anyone who suggested that this was OK should be summarily thrown out of your house.

    The job you need can be accomplished easily: after the gas main valve is turned off. It should be done by an experienced plumber because it will involve unscrewing a nipple which is connected inside the wall. That needs to be done carefully. I would insist on cutting into the drywall so that when the new nipple is put in a pressure test, or at least a soap test can be done on the new nipple.
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