Natural gas line routing

Discussion in 'Plumbing Code Questions' started by ankhseeker, Oct 16, 2013.

  1. ankhseeker

    ankhseeker Member

    Messages:
    78
    Location:
    California
    I have a natural gas line running in the attic to feed my furnace at the other end of the house. At the furnace, it drops through the ceiling down the inside of the furnace closet to the furnace valve.
    I want to run a "T" off of that line in the attic down the inside of a wall so that I can install a gas stove top where an electric one is.

    Is this legal? I know that I can't have a union in the gas line and it has to be black pipe. Is this legal? Tips and or ideas? Thanks!
  2. johnjh2o1

    johnjh2o1 Plumbing Contractor for 49 years

    Messages:
    1,142
    Location:
    South*East
    As long as the line is large enough to serve both appliances.
    John
  3. ankhseeker

    ankhseeker Member

    Messages:
    78
    Location:
    California
    So that means that there is a BTU or CFM specification for the pipe. I will also have to get the BTU specs for the furnace and stove and see if they are together less than the pipe spec? I am pretty sure that the supply is 3/4".
  4. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,285
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    gas

    You don't need a 1" line to feed gas to a range.
  5. Hammerlane

    Hammerlane New Member

    Messages:
    252
    Location:
    Ohio
    Make sure your line is sized for the furnace and stove to operate at the same time. Make sure there are no leaks.

    Here is a chart from the National Fuel Gas Code which shows the capacity of certain lengths and sizes of pipe.

    Attached Files:

  6. Hammerlane

    Hammerlane New Member

    Messages:
    252
    Location:
    Ohio
    Also remember that each fitting like a tee, elbow or a 45 has an equivalent length of straight pipe that has to be taken into consideration when calculating your developed length of pipe.

    You should establish what the developed pipe length is. By that I mean the actual length may only be 40 feet but you have to add in any 90's or Tee's as its equivalent length of pipe. A 1/2" 90 is equal to 1.55 feet and a 1/2" Tee is equal to 3.10 feet.

    So if you had say 6-90's and 1- Tee, that would be an additional 12 feet of pipe to consider for calculations

    Here is part of a table. Notice how a 1/2" tee is equivalent to 3.10 feet of straight pipe.

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Dec 23, 2013
  7. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,285
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    quote; Here is a chart from the National Fuel Gas Code which shows the capacity of certain lengths and sizes of pipe.

    However, you CANNOT say, "Well, I have 30' of 1", so it has a capacity of 284 cfm, 20' of 3/4 with 188 cfm, and 10' of 1/2" which can handle 131 cfm. You have to add ALL the dimensions, including fitting equivalences, then use THAT row, (i.e., 60' for this example),a capactiy of 195 for EACH pipe size. When you do that 1" has a capacity of 195 cfm, 3/4" carries 104 cfm, and 1/2" only 50 cfm.
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