Moving a Kitchen Sink about 3 feet

Discussion in 'Remodel Forum & Blog' started by russellclaude, Dec 10, 2006.

  1. russellclaude

    russellclaude New Member

    Messages:
    3
    I read in this forum that it isn't very hard to break up a slab and move som plumbing. That's good news! (if true)

    I have a sink that is located about 3 feet from the wall facing 90deg to the wall and I want to move it to the wall and facing the wall.

    What that means is than I need to take the pipe to the wall- not sure if that's where the pipe comes from... how is the best way to know how the pipe is routed in?

    I am hoping that all I have to do is break the slab, trim some pipe, fit pipe back together and fill the slab.

    I have to be missing something...
  2. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    You can GUESS at, but not be sure of, pipe locations by looking at where the sink is now, where the bathrooms are, where the cleanouts are , and where the main drain leaves the house headed for the street.

    This may be more than you want to take on. Given the short distance, one way to do it is to run the drain on the inside of the wall, sloped down hill and running through the cabinets. Not ideal, but you may need a plumber to do the work which might be entailed under the slab.

    Just to further compound the issue, do you know if you have a conventional slab, or a post-tensioned slab, which cannot be cut into.??
  3. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    You can GUESS at, but not be sure of, pipe locations by looking at where the sink is now, where the bathrooms are, where the cleanouts are , and where the main drain leaves the house headed for the street.

    This may be more than you want to take on. Given the short distance, one way to do it is to run the drain on the inside of the wall, sloped down hill and running through the cabinets. Not ideal, but you may need a plumber to do the work which might be entailed under the slab.

    Just to further compound the issue, do you know if you have a conventional slab, or a post-tensioned slab, which cannot be cut into.??
  4. russellclaude

    russellclaude New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Okay- I have no idea what kind of slab I have... its a newer home- less than 10 years old... how do I know what kind of slab I have?
  5. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,129
    Location:
    New England
    A conventional slab usually has rebar or steel mesh to reinforce it and is made up of just cement poured around it. A post tensioned slab has cables run through it to big bolts and nuts on the ends. These are tightened after the slab cures thus the post-tensioned name. These are often used in earthquake country, it just makes the slab stronger. You can get into some serious mess if you happen to cut one of the cables.
  6. russellclaude

    russellclaude New Member

    Messages:
    3
    its conventional

    I have never seen anything in these parts but a conventional slab, then... rebar, rebar and more rebar.
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