media guard kdf 55 good or bad?

Discussion in 'Water Softener Forum, problems, installation and r' started by sss, Oct 23, 2012.

  1. sss

    sss New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    Ontario
    I have been doing some research and I have got some mixed responses about the media guard kdf 55 (chlorine remover) what is the truth should this be installed in a softener or not?
  2. Akpsdvan

    Akpsdvan In the Trades

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    1,480
    Location:
    Alaska
    Worked with some thing much like media guard thing on the distributor just under the valve that had the kdf in it years ago and the pressure loss and flow lose had the customer asking for it to be removed asap..... never used that idea again.
    KDF 55 is great for the removal of chlorine from the water but it would be better used in its own tank with its own valve for back washing.
  3. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    I agree and IMO carbon/charcoal is a much better choice to remove chlorine. It is much less expensive and doesn't require the high gpm backwash that KDF does. But then I'm not a fan of removing chlorine on a whole house basis when you are on a 'city' water system.
  4. ditttohead

    ditttohead Water systems designer, R&D

    Messages:
    1,791
    Location:
    Ontario California
    The media guard using KDF-55 is an excellent product when applied correctly. KDF has a unique ability to remove chlorine in large volumes for extended periods of time as well as heavy metals removal. The media guard must be applied correctly to function properly.

    It should be used on smaller houses, no more than 2 bathrooms.
    The DLFC must be changed and sized correctly. a 4-5 GPM is ideal, regardless of the tank size. The backwash is for the media guard, not the softener.
    The softener should be sized to regenerate weekly.
    It should be changed every 3 years.

    If these steps are followed, the media guard is one of the better innovations in the water industry in thepast couple of decades. If these steps are not followed, it will have problems.
  5. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    How about listing the problems that are created with regenerating a small softener with that high a gpm.
  6. ditttohead

    ditttohead Water systems designer, R&D

    Messages:
    1,791
    Location:
    Ontario California
    Sure,
    There is no problem when the media guard is installed. The media guard seperates the backwash into the four chambers seperately and the fine slots do not create any problem with the resin. The backwash rate is for the KDF media guard, not for the resin. The resin will get backwashed just fine. The real problem with the media guards in the past is that people installed them without the higher backwash rate which would cause the KDF to turn into a chunk of cement and would restrict or cut off flow to the house.

    Hope this helps,
  7. sss

    sss New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    Ontario
    so carbon is better then kdf 55 to remove chlorine? I thought it was pretty much the same thing.
  8. ditttohead

    ditttohead Water systems designer, R&D

    Messages:
    1,791
    Location:
    Ontario California
    KDF and Carbon both remove chlorine very well. They are completely different processes, KDF uses redox, GAC uses adsorption. The media guard is a great, cheap way to get rid of 90% of the chlorine in the water. It has its limitations, but in general, the units we put out have a 99% success rate. We have almost no complaints when they are installed and applied correctly. I even have a few on friends and families softeners.
  9. sss

    sss New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    Ontario
    so that means a carbon is a better alternative to KDF right? Should I get a carbon filter instead then?
  10. ditttohead

    ditttohead Water systems designer, R&D

    Messages:
    1,791
    Location:
    Ontario California
    No, they are totally different and cant really be compared. It depends on your exact application. If you are trying to remove the chlorine from the whole house, I would recommend a large carbon system, not a carbon filter. Otherwise, if you want to keep it simple and low maintenance, the media guard is a great choice. A BB carbon filter has too low of a service flow rate to be recommended, though we sell container loads ofthis filter just for this application, we know it is improper. My own house has a 2 cu. ft. Catalytic GAC system as well as a 30 pound kdf backwashing unit. Heavy metals removal, chlorine removal, chloramine, etc.
    What is your exact application so we can recommend you the porper system?
  11. sss

    sss New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    Ontario
  12. sss

    sss New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    Ontario
    chlorine removal seems pretty difficult...
  13. sss

    sss New Member

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    11
    Location:
    Ontario
    Looks like all replies stop when you say you are buying from somewhere else. Interesting
  14. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    You have to raise the gpm of the DLFC of the softener to get the KDF backwashed in the Media Guard, that effects the resin backwash rate.

    When I say "carbon filter" I mean a backwashed filter, not a disposable cartridge filter.

    That will cost you more than a Media Guard but you'll be much happier over time and you'll recover that additional cost in less maintenance costs over the life of the softener.

    Not getting a reply as soon as you'd like has nothing to do with where you are thinking of buying something; or what you are buying in this case but would if what you are buying is not well known by those replying to you...
  15. Tom Sawyer

    Tom Sawyer In the Trades

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    3,072
    Location:
    Maine
    We don't care where you buy your equipment.
  16. ditttohead

    ditttohead Water systems designer, R&D

    Messages:
    1,791
    Location:
    Ontario California
    I know them well, great company, why would anyone here care where you buy it from? Unless you were going to buy absolute junk from the big box stores, or scam equipment, most people here dont care.

    I agree with Gary, the right way to do it is with a backwashing carbon tank, but if your budget is tight, and Aquatel puts in the right DLFC button (4-5 GPM depending on water temp), you will be very happy with the media guard. Even up to 10 GPM, we see a 90+% reduction in chlorine with a KDF55 media guard, and they last for 3+ years. You simply replace them every 3 years, and you are good to go. Replacement is fairly simple and fairly inexpensive. Plus you get the added benefits of heavy metals removal.
  17. sss

    sss New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    Ontario
    Thanks for the help guys and it is good to know ditto that you are familiar with the company.
  18. sss

    sss New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    Ontario
    Also people told me locally that the catalytic carbon dos a better job then the kdf 55. Meaning that it works better is this true?
  19. ditttohead

    ditttohead Water systems designer, R&D

    Messages:
    1,791
    Location:
    Ontario California
    LOL, as we have said before, it is a different media and works in a different way. They can not really be compared. The type of chlorine, the amount, the flow rates, competing elements, contact time, flow rates etc... Read through the website www.kdfft.com for details about how the media works and its abilities. Catalytic carbon has its abilities that vary greatly from KDF. Its like comparing a race car to a speed boat, they are too different to accurately compare. Many companies will tell you that a certain media is "better" due to a lack of knowledge, or product availability, etc.
  20. rideaway

    rideaway New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Raymond Alberta
    What about bacteria and algae growth in the carbon? I have a whole house chlorine removal system with a back washing carbon and a media guard. 1.5 cu. ft. of carbon 4 sections on the media guard. It worked great when it was working, but my problem is we had swampy water come through the town system a while back and after it had cleared up everywhere else mine continued. I'm guessing what ever it was is now growing in the carbon. So I take it apart and the media guard is not attached to the meter head. It's seem to be a very flimsy connection with thin plastic so I am assuming the kdf got plugged up and caused enough presser to pop off the media guard. Very poor set up in my opinion. Took apart the media guard and it was definitely clumped and hard. Who knows how long the media guard was on there. The carbon is still removing chlorine but not so sure the swampy tasting water is a good thing to be drinking. maybe just a smaller amount of carbon and change it every year or when something contaminates it would be the better Idea?
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