is flexible drain kit appropriate for my kitchen sink?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by Nikita, Aug 12, 2014.

  1. Nikita

    Nikita New Member

    Messages:
    17
    Hello,

    I am replacing my 2-bowl kitchen sink with a new model whose left bowl (connected to disposal) will be ~ 3.5" deeper. Looking to replace plumbing as well (see current setup) and, concerned about space, came across a flexible drain kit. Looks convenient. Any reason not to use one and go with a more conventional, rigid pipe? Is a certain pipe material more preferable?



    Also this kit is 1.5" inches whereas the waste drain and current p-trap are 2" and current. Any issue with using a 2" -> 1.5" reducer to connect this kit to the waste drain?
    http://snappytrap.com/

    [​IMG]

    Details
    • live in San Jose, CA
    • see photos here (also see captions)
    • waste drain and p-trap are 2" in diameter
    • disposal elbow and secondary sink's current tail piece are 1.5"
    • new sink diagram (left bowl ~ 3.5" deeper than current)
    thanks!

    -nikita
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 16, 2014
  2. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,349
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    These a never acceptable anywhere. They are sold to unsuspecting DIY because they look like a quick, easy, simple way around a problem. There is a way to do it right.
    SHR likes this.
  3. Nikita

    Nikita New Member

    Messages:
    17
    Thanks for you reply, Gary. Could you please elaborate on why, though?
    Also are flexible extensions like this one also not appropriate? thanks.
  4. asktom

    asktom Member

    Messages:
    557
    Location:
    Victor, MT
    I'm with Gary. The corregations accumulate slime and become a bacteria farm. Also, not close to legal.
  5. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,641
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Your existing system is 1 1/2" sch. 40 pipe, not 2", and most plumbers do not use it preferring 1 1/2" tubular drainage.
    SHR likes this.
  6. fullysprinklered

    fullysprinklered Member

    Messages:
    130
    Location:
    Georgia
    The really great thing about doing the drains on a kitchen sink is that is stays accessible. As a homeowner you can goober it up as much as you want and fix it later if it doesn't work.
  7. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,349
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    This may be acceptable in Georgia, but in the civilized world, codes prevail. Too many DIY think if their cobbled up job works, it's OK, so never mind the codes because codes are just there to make money for the government.
    the Redneck Teaparty wants to down size government by eliminating all regulations like this.
    johnjh2o1 likes this.
  8. Nikita

    Nikita New Member

    Messages:
    17
    Hi, HJ:

    Perhaps I am measuring the wrong thing, but I measured the circumference of both the p-trap and the waste drain (sticking out of the back wall). Both were 6", yielding a diameter of ~ 1.9". Why do you say it's 1.5"? Or are you not referring to either of these?

    FWIW the tail piece coming out of the non-disposal sink and the elbow coming out of the disposal are indeed 1.5".

    Thanks,
    -nikita
  9. asktom

    asktom Member

    Messages:
    557
    Location:
    Victor, MT
    There are two sizes of 1 1/2". 1 1/2" pipe has an outside dimension of 1 7/8" (about 1 1/2" inside). 1 1/2" tubular size is 1 1/2" OD.
  10. Nikita

    Nikita New Member

    Messages:
    17
  11. fullysprinklered

    fullysprinklered Member

    Messages:
    130
    Location:
    Georgia
    Not a good venue for political concerns.
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2014
  12. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,005
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    I think the simple answer is:

    Home centers sell all kinds of stuff that the plumbers can't legally use.
    I don't lose sleep over it though. When I'm working on a job, and I see that kind of stuff, it gets tossed, and I use the correct fitting from the truck.
    Can you use the fitting and have it work? Yes.
    Do the plumbers use them? No.

    Now lets not start discussing the music we listen to. That could really get out of hand. :)
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2014
    SHR and fullysprinklered like this.
  13. fullysprinklered

    fullysprinklered Member

    Messages:
    130
    Location:
    Georgia
    Thanks, Terry. May reason prevail.
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