installing linoleum flooring directly on conrete

Discussion in 'Remodel Forum & Blog' started by miner49er, Oct 23, 2007.

  1. miner49er

    miner49er New Member

    Messages:
    7
    hello,

    i am installing a bathroom (toilet/sink) in my basement.

    1) i've read about Saniflo's ---Saniplus toilet system? Whats your opinion on this toilet system?

    2) i would like to install linoleum flooring directly on the concrete in the basement. Is this an easy task? how do you do it?

    all advice would be appreciated.

    thanks
  2. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    2) Before installing any flooring in the basement, you would need to do a moisture test on the concrete. If there is any moisture present, this will present a problem, and require a moisture barrier.

    Then, of course sheet flooring requires an absolutely smooth and flawless foundation, so the floor would probably have to be skimmed, patched , etc. This part is very doable .
  3. Bosun

    Bosun New Member

    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    Minneapolis
    skip the Lino

    I'd go with cermamic tile. A bit more money now, but the labor on your lino install is going to add up.
  4. miner49er

    miner49er New Member

    Messages:
    7
    how do you test for moisture?

    if not acceptable, what is the moisture barrier that you would use?


    why tile?

    which product would be "warmer" on the cold floor?

    i appreciate all the answers that i get!!
  5. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,266
    Location:
    New England
    Take about a 2' square piece of plastic and tape it down to the floor for 24-hours. See if there is any accumulated moisture under the plastic at the end of that time.

    The linoleum will be the same temp as the tile, but the tile will feel colder. They both will feel cold, though. Consider electric heat mats.
  6. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    1. what JAD said.

    2. you can paint the floor with a moisture barrier like RedGuard. This is not smooth enough to put sheet goods on, but would be a good base for ceramic tile, including the under-tile heat mats if desired.
  7. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,266
    Location:
    New England
  8. cork tiles are the warmest. They are a sandwich of MDF between layers of cork.

    that is the cheapest solution. The next best thing to a heated tile floor.

    i.m.o.

    david
  9. Bosun

    Bosun New Member

    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    Minneapolis
    I love tile

    If you have the tile done correctly, you will be happy for many years. I'm not a huge fan of sheetgoods, but some people are. If you have a lot of space to cover, sheetgoods are a great way to save money.

    Both will be the same temp. Both will be cold in the winter. Look at the little LV heat mats they sell at the big boxes.

    Make sure the man. and installer will warranty below grade installations. I know that some wont.
  10. frenchie

    frenchie Jack of all trades

    David - cork tiles in a bathroom?
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