Installing a Thermostatic Mixing Valve

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by tilleyd, May 13, 2013.

  1. tilleyd

    tilleyd New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Minnesota
    Hello,

    My whirlpool tub runs out of hot water and I was advised by the water-heater manufacturer(AOSMITH Vertex) to install a thermostatic mixing valve and then set the water heater to the highest setting. They said this would also be more energy-efficient.

    Now, I'm not a plumber but I do like to take on DIY projects. Can you please share a good brand Thermostatic Mixing Valve that is easy to install and does not require complex techiques? I would love to try installing one myself. Also a helpful video of the process would be greatly appreciated. Any help is appreciated!

    Thanks,
    Tilley
  2. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    14,904
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Last edited: May 13, 2013
  3. Tom Sawyer

    Tom Sawyer In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,135
    Location:
    Maine
    A lot depends on the size and recovery rate of your water heater and the size of your whirlpool and the flow rate of the faucet.
  4. essjay

    essjay New Member

    Messages:
    23
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Are there any limitations to using a thermostatic mixing valve or are they set and forget? Any preventative maint. required?

    The install instructions describe setting a temp strip on the mixed output and adjusting to desired temp. BUT, if there is a big temp swing in cold water supply between winter and summer months (think 30 degrees plus) will this valve be able to handle the swing? Have not found any documentation regarding this point.
  5. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    14,904
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    It locks in the temperature.
  6. tilleyd

    tilleyd New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Location:
    Minnesota
    According to my conversation with Aquatic Bath & Tub, Terry is correct. These valves lock in the temperature, mixing in the correct amount of cold water, regardless of the initial water's temperature. Supposedly this will save me a lot of $$$ on my energy bill and also provide a longer lasting supply of hot water. I look forward to testing this out!
  7. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,917
    Location:
    New England
    Where I live, they are required on ALL WH installations/replacements as a safety feature. Running your tank hotter will not save you money for energy, since the hotter the tank, the more standby losses there are. It does not make much of any difference in the actual heating of the water, though, as it takes the same amount of energy to actually heat it. It does provide safety and an effectively larger WH (if you raise the storage temp) delivered volume, since it's mixing some cold into the output which means for each gallon of hot delivered to the fixture, you're using less than a gallon of heated water. It can allow you to get by with a smaller tank, which has some benefits in costs and space, though. It's not magic, though, when your tank cools off below the mixing valve, you'll get essentially straight out of the tank, depleting what little hot water's left faster since it will no longer be mixing in cold to 'temper' the output. These things are often referred to as a tempering valve.
  8. mikeplummer

    mikeplummer Plumber

    Messages:
    190
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
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