I need to pull a new circuit for a hot tub.

Discussion in 'Electrical Forum discussion & Blog' started by Erico, Nov 17, 2007.

  1. Erico

    Erico New Member

    Messages:
    73
    Location:
    NY
    The specs. only require a dedicated 120volt 15 amp circuit (no heater or anything fancy).....and, of course, a GFI outlet.

    I'm assuming I can use 14 gague wire??? I would probably use 12 gague but I'm concerned with the actual mechanics of pulling a thicker wire through 50 plus feet of existing conduit. it's a second floor condo with the panel located in the basement storage area.

    Re: The mechanics of pulling new wire through existing conduit......

    My plan is to disconnect an existing wire to use that wire to pull the two new wires (hot and nuetral) AND a new hot to replace the wire I'm using for the "pull."

    There seems to be enough room to add the two new wires. I guess my main concern is getting the wires tangled half-way through the pull - the other thought was to pull ALL new wires at once.

    On the plus side - The original electrician was nice enough to provide a large juntion box where the wires make the turn to go upstairs. It's one continouous set of wires but it will enable the wires to be pulled over and THEN up. If not for the junction, I don't think I would attempt this myself.

    Any thoughts? Should I use some sort of wire lubricating product? Should I pull all new wire?

    Thanks in advance. Great site!!!
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2007
  2. 480sparky

    480sparky In the Trades

    Messages:
    149
    It's not easy to pull NM through condiut. I would suggest THHN instead. And you will need to perform a raceway fill calculation before you do anything.

    It is possible to use an existing wire to pull through the new circuit plus the replacement. And yes, it will most likely get tangled up.
  3. Alectrician

    Alectrician DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    689
    If you tell us what size conduit and how many wires we could tell you for sure.



    Did he imply NM?


    It's best NOT to assume. 14 is good for 15 amps but here(AZ), in a commercial application (conduit), 14 is not allowed. #12 won't be much of a difference.



    Think areodynamicly when attaching your wires. Strip and fold you pull wire over about 4 inches. Tape it TIGHTLY so the cut end doesn't hang up. Strip your new wires about 6 inches and fold them back half way. Pinch them tight and as stealthy as you can. Tape them tightly but a big wad of tape is not good. .

    Stranded wire will pull thru easier than solid.. Don't scuff the insulation as it enters the conduit. The wires COULD get tangled but it is rare. A little lube never hurts. Pull smooooothly.

    Sometimes I tape the wire without folding them around the pull wire. You probably dont want to try this.

    As always, BE CAREFUL as you could die or kill someone else.
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2007
  4. Erico

    Erico New Member

    Messages:
    73
    Location:
    NY
    Thanks for the reply!

    Difinitely THHN.....not NM.
  5. 480sparky

    480sparky In the Trades

    Messages:
    149
    Pull soap (wire lubricant) will help as well. Don't be afraid to use it. Lots of it. It's designed not to damage the insulation.
    And if you can get help, all the better. Just about every wire pull goes better when there's one person pulling and another feeding.
  6. Erico

    Erico New Member

    Messages:
    73
    Location:
    NY
    *gulp* Yes, eletricity scares me enough to be very careful. Thanks!

    I will count the wires and measure the conduit in the am if you don't mind giving your opinion.

    Definitely not NM as this is Chicago where everything is in conduit - including residential. I figured 14 was OK as that's what is there AND I remember reading 14 was OK for 15 Amps.

    Is stranded wire OK for this application? What's the difference or negatives between the two - if any?

    Thanks for your help!
  7. Alectrician

    Alectrician DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    689
    Stranded is easier to pull but harder to control as it tends to coil up and get tied in a knot (outside of the conduit). Solid is easier to terminate at standard recepticals/switches as they have a simple screw terminal. Your GFCI will likely have lug style terminal where the wire lays under a tab.
  8. Erico

    Erico New Member

    Messages:
    73
    Location:
    NY

    Done!! The wires are pulled!

    I see what you mean about the stranded wire coiling up. Lucky I had a couple extra sets of hands. Other than that, it went through easy.

    I DID have a question I meant to ask before I did this: Did I HAVE to pull a new nuetral wire? Unless I'm missing something, it appears there isn't as many nuetral/white wires as there are circuits. Is it always a one-to-one ratio? Or do they piggy-back them? I ran the new nuetral anyway.

    Thanks for your help!
  9. Erico

    Erico New Member

    Messages:
    73
    Location:
    NY
    Done! I took your advice and used plenty of wire lubricant - the wire went like poop through a goose.

    Thanks for your help!
  10. Alectrician

    Alectrician DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    689
    Glad to see you're still alive.

    Circuits on opposite legs can use the same neutral but you were wise to pull a new one.
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