How to separate PVC pipes

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by mntentman, Jan 31, 2010.

  1. mntentman

    mntentman New Member

    Messages:
    68
    I sawed off a portion of the PVC in the photo so I could remove a shower basin wth built-in drain. Could someone be kind enough to advise on the next steps? I am wondering if there is a way to remove the top portion of the pipe at the connector point, which would then, I am supposing, allow me to easily attach the replacement pipe. Or is there a different way to go? Thanks much.

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  2. jc60618

    jc60618 DIY Junior Member

    Messages:
    88
    Location:
    Chicago
    You have three options.
    1. Cut that top piece of pipe as straight as possible add a coupling and extend the piece to the desired height.
    2. Cut the p trap and install a new one.
    3. You can attempt to cape the piece out. This is accomplished by making several cuts inside of the pipe with a hack saw and with a chisel you try to "pry'' it off. Option 1 is probably the best way to go.
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2010
  3. mntentman

    mntentman New Member

    Messages:
    68
    Thanks, jc. Option 1 definitely sounds like the best route. But let me make sure I am doing it right (please excuse my lack of knowledge on this subject). This pipe appears to be 2 1/4 inches in diameter... does that sound like the right measurement? Would I get a pipe that would fit inside the piece that is cut? If there is link to a piece such as I need to get, it would be great. I am assuming it will need to be short, as the new pipe from the drain will connect to it... ? Thanks again.
  4. jc60618

    jc60618 DIY Junior Member

    Messages:
    88
    Location:
    Chicago
    All you have to get is a 2" PVC coupling and some 2'' PVC Pipe. The coupling goes over the pipe.[​IMG]
  5. krow

    krow Plumber

    Messages:
    906
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    We take the inside diameter of the pipe to establish the pipe size. From the picture, it looks like 1 1/2
  6. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,995
    Location:
    New England
    Several companies make a special bit that will ream out the pipe from the socket in that P-trap allowing you to cement in a new piece of pipe. Now, for the cost of that, you could easily cut off the whole p-trap and rebuild the section with new pvc pieces. That tool makes more sense if you have a complex fitting that you don't want to cut out. If the OD is about 2-1/4" (it's probably closer to 2-1/2"), then it's a 2" ID pipe, which is what current code requires for a shower.

    PVC pipes are solvent welded together, and it is difficult to take apart. The cement literally melts the surface layer of the plastic and welds it together as the solvent evaporates. You don't take a joint apart easily, nor is it designed to come apart.
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2010
  7. mntentman

    mntentman New Member

    Messages:
    68
    It's a 2-inch pipe. Got the coupler and a length of pipe, and all worked out fine. Thanks for the help.
  8. tilelayher

    tilelayher New Member

    Messages:
    35
    Isn't 2" code for a stall shower? 1 1/2" for tubs only. Hense its a 2" pipe.
  9. export!

    export! DIY Member

    Messages:
    90
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    That's flawed logic.
  10. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,618
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    The job is done, but if the pipe is BIGGER than 1 7/8", it is NOT 1 1/2" pipe, and therefore it is 2" and the actual size is 2 3/8". The logic being that there is NOTHING between the two sizes and 2 1/4" is too large for 1 1/2".
  11. export!

    export! DIY Member

    Messages:
    90
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    Citing the measurements is an excellent way to deduce the size. What I was pointing out is assuming the size by what is required is often inaccurate.

    It's like looking at an old sagging ,shingled roof and wondering how many layers there are and saying "well it's either one or two because code here doesn't allow more than two".
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