How to install tee

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by p-61@msn.com, Jan 14, 2006.

  1. p-61@msn.com

    p-61@msn.com New Member

    Messages:
    5
    How to install tee?

    I need to install a tee at the circle. If I have to cut the lenght of the tee out what will be left to soldier. I can't cut the pipe and move it up or down to install the tee.

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    Last edited: Jan 14, 2006
  2. Cass

    Cass Plumber

    Messages:
    5,980
    Location:
    Ohio
    You need to use a slip coupling and install a short nipple on one side of the T. You cut the pipe slide the t on 1 side and measure the other where the nipple stops and cut the pipe there. Slide the slip coupling all the way on the copper pipe, install the T, slide the coupling 1/2 way up the nipple, aim the T where you want it, and solder it up or continue running your copper and then solder.

    Be sure to clean and flux all pipe and fittings to be soldered.
  3. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,156
    Location:
    New England
    A slip coupling is basically a straight coupler without the normal stop in the middle that centers the two pieces of pipe. This allows it to slide entirely over the pipe. It's not a bad idea to mark or measure the pipe so that when you slide it back over the cut portion, you've got about 1/2 of it over each cut portion.
  4. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,136
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    There is no rule that says you have to run this straight.

    If you buy three 90 els and a tee, you can offset the pipe and add the tee without a slip coupling.
  5. Cass

    Cass Plumber

    Messages:
    5,980
    Location:
    Ohio
    While this is true when I see work like that I think to my self... Hmmm a wanabe or home owner. :D :D.
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2006
  6. plumber1

    plumber1 Plumber

    Messages:
    1,423
    Location:
    Florida
    copper tee

    I gotta believe that if you just cut out 3/4" that you will be able to get enough movement to get the tee where you want it. I don't see any problem.
  7. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    When I see a situation like that I always wonder if it will be possible to get all the water out of the lower pipe and shut it off completely. If there is a trickle of water or the water can't be removed, it will be impossible to solder. If there is NO water from the lower pipe, and the valve above doesn't leak, then the water can be displaced from the lower one and the joint can be soldered.
  8. p-61@msn.com

    p-61@msn.com New Member

    Messages:
    5
    I thought of using a product called Just For Copper. Have any used it or know anything about it?
  9. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    Just For Copper

    I'm looking forward to reading the comments from the pros on this site. I notice that none of the testimonials on the Just for Copper site are from pros.
    http://www.justforcopper.com/Products.htm
  10. TonyBagadonutz

    TonyBagadonutz Electrician

    Messages:
    126
    Location:
    NJ
    I don't know anything about it....BUT...I read their spec sheet ( Technical Specifications )...and to say the least: I am not impressed

    18ºC = 64.4ºF
    24ºC = 75.2ºF
    F= (C*1.8)+32

    That's not too impressive of a spread - 10.6ºF....and that wall appears to be an exterior wall (pipe to a hose bibb?). Are you certain that area will remain within the parameters indicated? For more than a year?

    I *might* consider it a band aid on a second home/rental property - just until I can return with some fittings and a torch.
  11. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    That temperature range is in the bottle, after opening, before use. After installation the temp is -40 to +250F.
  12. plumber1

    plumber1 Plumber

    Messages:
    1,423
    Location:
    Florida
    soldering

    Just turn the water off and take the pressure off somewhere at a fixture that's low in tour house, like the basement laundry tub.

    Shine that pipe with sand cloth.

    Cut 3/4" out of the pipe at the point that your putting the tee. If you need to dry out the pipe, use the torch. You can boil the water out of that lower part.

    Solder the tee and a short piece of pipe, then solder on a valve.
    I think you will find that its not difficult.......
  13. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,360
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    Not a very fancy solution for water in a short length of pipe like this, but with a short length of tubing you can suck the water out.
  14. p-61@msn.com

    p-61@msn.com New Member

    Messages:
    5
    this is inside of my basement. The part going into the wall is going to the outside faucet.
  15. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,360
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    Then this is really simple. The stopless coupler is a simple answer. What is the point of using some "just as good as" product when sweating with a torch is so simple, so sure, and so time proven?
  16. TonyBagadonutz

    TonyBagadonutz Electrician

    Messages:
    126
    Location:
    NJ
    Is your area prone to freezing?
    Add a frost free bibb and the "tee" dilemma becomes a "non-issue".

    [​IMG]
  17. Cass

    Cass Plumber

    Messages:
    5,980
    Location:
    Ohio
    Woodford makes one that is supposed to be burst proof if the hose is left on for a few $$ more. It back feeds into the water line if the pressure exceeds 300 or 350#. The one above does not have / show an anti siphon vacume breaker on it which it should. Like this.

    [​IMG]
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 22, 2008
  18. p-61@msn.com

    p-61@msn.com New Member

    Messages:
    5
    If you can't tell this is my first plumbing job. So forgive the stupid questions. How hard is it to get the faucet out? Do I have to put concrete back in?
  19. p-61@msn.com

    p-61@msn.com New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Got it done. Once I cut out 3/4" i was able to slip the tee in. Thanks alot for all the help.
  20. Amopower

    Amopower New Member

    Messages:
    61
    Location:
    Virginia
    If you are doing a CPVC slip coupler, how do you apply the cement to the slip coupling? Do you just apply a liberal amount to the area you are gluing to, slide the coupler into position, and hope there's enough glue to make a proper seal inside the coupler?
    (and how long do you typically have to wait for the glue to be thoroughly dried before you turn the water on?)
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2006
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