How durable are flexible supply lines?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by SteveW, Apr 12, 2005.

  1. SteveW

    SteveW DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,053
    Location:
    Omaha, NE
    I just overhauled a toilet tank with new innards, and am now replacing the supply line since I've got a leak where the supply line connects with the bottom of the fill valve. I bought a stainless steel-braided flexible supply line from Fluidmaster. I have to say that these things sure make life simpler for the DIY'er since every time I've bent a solid supply line, I've either kinked it or had trouble getting the bends just right so everything lines up hunky-dory.

    On the other hand, the flexible lines don't look quite as nice as a chrome rigid line.

    How well do these flexible lines hold up? Is there a replacement interval? Is there any difference between the stainless-steel-braided ones and the plain white plastic, or the thin gray, ones?

    Thanks for your opinions and experience in advance.
    Steve
  2. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,253
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    supply lines

    Use the thin gray ones if you feel lucky and don't care if you wake up to a flooded floor someday. The white plastic ones are better, but they will also snap at the end connections occassionally. Use the metal braided ones even though they are not the nicest looking in an exposed situation.
  3. SteveW

    SteveW DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,053
    Location:
    Omaha, NE
    Thanks, hj -- that's what I figured.

    By the way, are these flexible lines strictly a DIY option or do the pros use them too?
  4. macska

    macska New Member

    Messages:
    32
    What's the best (easiest) way to bend the rigid chrome supply lines?
  5. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,253
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    lines

    Steve. Definitely. The only other things I use are corrugated one piece valves and supply tubes on "contract" jobs where price was a factor. The stainless steel ones are used on all service replacements.

    Macska. unless it is a gentle bend where using your hands will suffice, you need a lever type tubing bender. Do not even think of using "bending springs". They are more bother than they are worth.
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2005
  6. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    14,770
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Whenever I see a "one_piece" stop with corragated supply I replace them.

    One bend too many and they will crack. You don't notice this much on new construction, you are the one doing the first bend.

    [​IMG]

    On replacements, I won't reuse them.
    Using a "sleeve puller", I remove the old stop and wall plate.
    A new wall plate goes on and a new stop, with new stainless braided supply tube.
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2006
  7. SteveW

    SteveW DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,053
    Location:
    Omaha, NE
    Very helpful info, hj and Terry.

    hj: You confirmed my limited experience with bending springs -- didn't keep me from kinking those solid supply lines! Good to know that a real tubing bender works much better.

    Terry: How are the one-piece stops you mention attached to the water line? Sounds like some sort of friction fit if you can pull them off with a sleeve puller?

    [​IMG]
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 6, 2009
  8. macska

    macska New Member

    Messages:
    32
  9. SteveW

    SteveW DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,053
    Location:
    Omaha, NE
    Curious about one-piece stops

    So, hj or Terry,

    I'm still curious about the one-piece stops you describe. When you say one-piece, I take it this is an angle stop with an integrated corrugated supply line, right? And I take it, its main virtue is quick installation.

    How are they attached to the stubbed-out water line? Compression fitting?

    Thanks,
    Steve
  10. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    14,770
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    They like most stops are compression.

    If you read the instructions for them, it says you can use light oil on the threads.
    You don't want to use Teflon Tape or pipe sealant on these, something like WD40 works fine.

    don't over tighten either. You don't want to dent the pipe.

    If you have 1-piece angle stops with the corragated copper tube, don't reuse them.
    They should be replaced if you do any work with them.
  11. SteveW

    SteveW DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    1,053
    Location:
    Omaha, NE
    Thanks, Terry.

    I learn something every time I visit this site!
Similar Threads: durable flexible
Forum Title Date
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Advice in picking durable shower/tub rough in valve Feb 8, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Durable Fixture Wanted Mar 2, 2009
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Can you use flexible rubber cuppling at bathroom sink drain? Photo May 28, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Old Flexible Lead Pipe, HOW to attach to? Mar 7, 2013
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Flexible ABS bath drain? WatcoFlex® Feb 15, 2012

Share This Page