How can I (properly) build a simple rectangular deck?

Discussion in 'Remodel Forum & Blog' started by amateurplumber1, Jul 29, 2014.

  1. amateurplumber1

    amateurplumber1 Member

    Messages:
    173
    Location:
    Here
    We had a guy build a second half to our deck a few years ago and its completely falling apart. I want to rip it apart and rebuild, but I dont know much about the necessary spacing and depth and width of the wood and stuff. The deck is 10x20 and it's probably about 6 feet above our backyard. Are there any plans you guys can give me or just general advice?

    Thanks!
  2. nukeman

    nukeman Nuclear Engineer

    Messages:
    711
    Location:
    VA
    Something like this will give you the basics. Things like footing depth and some other aspects will depend on your location. However, most of this should work in your location. You will probably need permits if doing anything beyond a repair of the old deck.

    http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/dpwes/publications/decks/details.pdf
  3. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,230
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    What is wrong with just making the new one like the old one, but better construction?
  4. koa

    koa Member

    Messages:
    84
    Location:
    Hawaii
    I've built a few decks for myself and friends using Trex, Ipe, tile, Timbertech, and painted PT lumber.
    Trex
    [​IMG]
    Ipe
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    The most recent one was a Timbertech decking in a wet area.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    What I did on this last deck was the following to make sure the deck lasts a really long time.

    The framing was designed to drain water so the spaces between boards never lined up with framing.
    Flashing between house and deck so water sheds away from house.
    The Timbertech was a PVC product so the deck was framed 12" on center so there's no flex of deck boards.
    All framing was solid body stained before installing.
    All end cuts were coated with West Systems Epoxy.
    Any joints where wood met wood was caulked with polyurethane.
    All deck boards were also set in polyurethane on joists.
    All joists were wrapped with Peal and Seal roofing to seal out moisture.
    All bolt holes were sealed with epoxy and bolts were imbedded with polyurethane.
    No post is attached to the house, all are free standing.
    Any through screwed boards were countersunk and plugged with matching textured plugs.
    Hidden fasteners were used to secure deck boards.
    Blocking was lowered to not interfere with drainage.

    I doubt you will want to do all these things but you should make sure water can shed easily, paint the framing, use some sort of product to seal end cuts, use a joist wrap to protect top of joists, lower blocking, caulk where there's wood joints and make sure there's flashing between house and deck. Plan out your framing based on your materials including where your posts will be and how they interact with decking.
  5. amateurplumber1

    amateurplumber1 Member

    Messages:
    173
    Location:
    Here
    This is in fact what I am going for. However, I am trying to figure out what 'better construction' entails, exactly, since this one is such a mess.

    Here is an album of images of my mostly torn apart deck.
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