Help with the proper connectors with cast to PVC

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by RK05, May 13, 2013.

  1. RK05

    RK05 New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    Cincinnati
    I'm going to try and tackle my plumbing for a basement remodel. I have two plumbing connections that I need to make, 1) replace the old shower with new for a Sterling shower enclosure. 2) Replace old bar with a new "wet" bar setup but do a proper connection not like what I found.

    Here are some pics.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    How for down do I need to go under my foundation to make the transition from cast to PVC? An even bigger question is what type of connector must be used, Fernco?

    There isn't a vent for the wet bar, so could I use one of those sink vents that gets mounted up by the top of the counter? Sorry don't know the correct name.

    Also, I found the cleanout for the main stack behind the basement bathroom wall behind the toilet. Should I put on one of the access covers that you can use to get to plumbing in drywall ceiling and such or just drywall it and remember that I may need to open that spot up if I ever need to get access there?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    If I left out more info (which I'm sure I did) just ask and I will try to answer it for you.

    Thanks!
  2. RK05

    RK05 New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    Cincinnati
    Come one guys and girls I'm sure one of you can point out what the proper transition connector would be going from CI to PVC for these two applications. My plumber went AWOL so I'm left with doing this myself!

    I'm sure its fernco type of fitting but more interested in how deep I need it in the ground?

    I have a clean out between the house and the street so I am not going to bother with the one by the toilet.
  3. asktom

    asktom Member

    Messages:
    531
    Location:
    Victor, MT
    Comment deleted.
    Last edited: May 14, 2013
  4. RK05

    RK05 New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    Cincinnati
    THIS item from HD looks like it could work?
  5. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,334
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    Fernco is a brand name. The one most commonly thought of with the name "Fernco" is a neoprene sleeve with stainless steel hose clamps on each end. This are for underground use only. The type you must use for above ground connections is a banded coupler. These have a stainless steel band that covers the entire sleeve. Fernco makes these as well as other companies. The band must match the materials on each end. Cast sizes can vary. I would suggest a professional plumbing shop to get the proper sized coupler. You might also consider if this a DIY job. An AAV might or might not be legal where you are for venting the bar sink. The clean out should not be buried behind a wall.
  6. RK05

    RK05 New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    Cincinnati
    Thanks for the reply Gary. Yes, from searching this site I see that fernco is a brand and generic name used for these types of connectors. With my current CI ending flush with the floor if I wanted to use the banded type coupler I would need to dig down enough to expose enough of the CI for the correct fitting correct? Would I be better off using a donut type coupler or a Manhoff fitting? I found THIS previous post which is similar but working on a horizontal pipe.

    I will check on the AAV and put an access cover for the clean out then.

    Thanks
  7. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,932
    Location:
    New England
    A donut works into a hub, but since there's no standard on the size of the hub (only the ID of the main pipe), finding the properly sized donut may be problematic as well. A banded coupler is designed to connect to the normal pipe run, not a hub. ANd, since the CI and the PVC are usually a different OD, you need to find the proper banded coupler or it could leak, or be very tight to get on.
  8. RK05

    RK05 New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    Cincinnati
    What would you suggest to be my best approach to this?

    Should I try and remove all the concrete or whatever is around the opening to the sink drain and do the same thing for the shower as well as remove the inner 4" drain? Then I could get a better measurment on the ID of both pipes.

    Without clearing that stuff out of the way would you think both of those pipes are hub ends sticking out?

    There is at least a 2' drop in each pipe to the bottom

    Thanks
  9. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,244
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    Not sure what goes where in your photos, but when installed the bottom of the shower drain sits below the top of the concrete, and the trap must be positioned properly below the floor. The shower drain must be 2", and there must be a vent downstream of the trap to prevent it from siphoning.
  10. RK05

    RK05 New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    Cincinnati
    Those pics are for two different areas. The vent for the shower is about maybe 4' away from the drain. The drain is up because I removed about 4~5" of shower bed under what I believe was a lead shower pan. I believe there is a trap way down below (there is about a 2' or better distance from the floor to the water) since I can see standing water and no sewer smell.

    Is there a way to check to make sure there is a p-trap somehow buried below?
  11. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,932
    Location:
    New England
    Unless there's a clog, standing water indicates a p-trap. Pour some water in, and if the level stays the same after a moment, it must have a p-trap and not be clogged. While the drains underneath the slab could be perfectly fine, they may also be on their last legs...it's a shame to install a new shower and shortly after find that there's a leak or the trap has collapsed because it rusted through.
  12. RK05

    RK05 New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    Cincinnati
    I will try the water to see if it stays at its current level.

    Are you referring to the condition of the drains under ground based off of the picture of the shower drain? I don't have the money to fix something that isn't broken yet. I'm all for preventative maintenance but is there a compelling reason to change it out now??
    Last edited: May 15, 2013
  13. asktom

    asktom Member

    Messages:
    531
    Location:
    Victor, MT
    Is the drain on your Sterling enclosure really going to line up with your old drain? That sounds too lucky to me. If not, you are going to have to bust up the concrete and at that point you will be able to see what is going on down below.

    I can't tell from your picture exactly what is going on with the connection of the lavatory drain at the floor. It looks like PVC tubular was shoved into a wiped lead joint. I think somebody faked it there. What you find when you remove the lead will determine the correct connection.
  14. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,932
    Location:
    New England
    Plumbing underground can last for a very long time. Sometimes it doesn't. Hopefully, yours has.
  15. RK05

    RK05 New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    Cincinnati
    It will line up because the old shower was almost 60" wide and I am putting in a 48" wide unit (72220100). I already have the backwall and one side wall framed out for the enclosure.

    That is the way I take it, that the previous owner just shoved the PVC pipe into the drain and cemented around it. I am hopefully going to get to work on the drains this weekend.

    Should I try removing the smaller 4" drain out of the larger flush CI piece? I was going to remove the stainer and look down and see how far that 4" CI goes down the larger one. Wasn't sure if I should not mess with it if I were to use a banding coupler but I don't think I will be able due to the height of that piece and my shower pan?
  16. RK05

    RK05 New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    Cincinnati
    Ok, so I have some better photos of this shower drain that I hope will allow you guys to give me some better advice on how to procede. The height from the floor to the top of the drain is right at 2".


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]



    I was looking at the sink drain and it looks and feels like the square hole is some kind of metal. I tried a little bit to get it off but it was not budging and I didn't know if it possibly could be threaded on?


    [​IMG]

    I would really like to do this myself, one so that I can say I did that and two I don't have the $$ to pay to have it done.

    Actually, we do have the money but that leaves less money elsewhere.

    Thanks all!
  17. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,932
    Location:
    New England
    This is a guess...the top part of the shower drain may unscrew. Then, you'd have access to the clamping ring to take it off. Then, you'd have room to see what's left and deal with it. The squared off opening is probably distorted lead and if so, it is attached with solder. To get things off and see what you have to work with, you'll need to dig out some concrete.
  18. RK05

    RK05 New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    Cincinnati
    What would be the best way to try to unscrew the drain flange? Use a pipe wrench on in with another holding the lower nut and try unscrewing it?

    The same thing with the sink drain. If its soldered in am I going to just have to pry it out?

    Sorry for all the questions but I don't want to break anything.

    Thanks!
  19. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,932
    Location:
    New England
    You'll have to wait for a pro to get a more detailed description of what to expect. When new, that upper part of the drain would just screw in/out to adjust the height to accommodate various heights of tile and the mud setting bed...after it's been in there for a long time, who's to say. The clamping ring normally has some screws or bolts holding it to the part that's actually attached to the drain (the liner would go between those two pieces). The bottom piece may be leaded to the CI. If something breaks while you try to unscrew it, it should be replaced anyway.
  20. RK05

    RK05 New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    Cincinnati
    Thanks, hopefully Terry or someone else who removes these allot will chime in.

    When I stopped by the Ferguson supply house they said that was probably the type of drain that I had by showing them the pictures. The shower kit I'm putting in has a 4" hole so I will need to put in a larger drain for sure.
Similar Threads: Help proper
Forum Title Date
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Properly venting a toilet underslab, help please! Jun 25, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Help with proper waste/vent fittings Jan 30, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Need Help Please! Water Filtration Not Operating Properly.. May 7, 2012
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Proper drain and vent help needed Oct 30, 2010
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Help with proper fittings, pic included Sep 1, 2009

Share This Page