Help to identify wood flooring (pics)

Discussion in 'Remodel Forum & Blog' started by Lakee911, Mar 11, 2006.

  1. Lakee911

    Lakee911 I&C Engineer (mostly WWTP)

    Messages:
    1,328
    Location:
    Columbus, OH
    I know this is difficult to do online, but I was hoping someone could help me identify my wood flooring, as well as point me in the right direction of where to find matching stock.

    On the left, I have some sort of pine I think--maybe fir? 2 1/4 x 3/4 -- what kind is this?
    [​IMG]
    Another shot of the pine
    [​IMG]

    Here I have an type of oak floor -- I'm not sure if its red or white though. I'ts 1 1/2 x 3/8.
    [​IMG]
    Shot of the end grain where I've scraped away a small bit to expose the grain.
    [​IMG]

    I'm looking to obtain 100sqft of the pine for a small addition and patch/repair work.

    I'm looking to obtain 210sqft of the oak for a kitchen remodel and patch/repair work.

    Thanks,
    Jason
  2. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    The pine looks like quartersawn (sometimes called vertical grain) hard yellow pine.

    The oak looks like flat sawn oak but it's hard to tell the species. I suggest heavy sanding down to raw wood, then compare it to samples of what you are going to buy.
  3. toolaholic

    toolaholic General Contractor Carpenter

    Messages:
    874
    Location:
    Marin Co. Ca.
    left is VERTICLE GRAIN DOUGLAS FIR

    we use to buy it in Boston all the time ,years ago

    today i'm a carpenter in the Bay area and it,s in all the yards

    take the second piece to any floor layer, or refinisher and you'll get a DEFINATE answer, in a heartbeat. may be red oak , maybe not :rolleyes:
  4. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,313
    Location:
    New England
    If you sand the oak, you should be able to tell. White oak really is much lighter than red oak. The definitive test (a magnifying lens may help) is if the xylem and floem tubes are blocked or open. The reason they use white oak for barrels is that these small tubes are blocked (in the mature wood)- if they used red oak, they would leak by weeping the liquids out through all of the small pores.
  5. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    JAD: you are indeed a pro because you can spell xylem and floem and on top of that you know what they mean! I am still cleaning my glasses....I though they must be fogged up because those can't actually be words!
  6. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,313
    Location:
    New England
    Well, I got phloem spelled phonetically...it's been a long time since I learned that in school :)
  7. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    There you go again....using words like phone-etic! Does this have to do with not talking on the cell phone in the thee-ater?
  8. jdkimes

    jdkimes Engineer

    Messages:
    181
    Location:
    Littleton, CO
    I agree that the one on the top left and the second photo is douglas fir (the softest of the hardwoods) and when finised nicely is very beautiful but does show scuffing and indents easily (for example don't roll a chair or bed wheel over it). I had it in a house in Wisconsin. I do remember one problem with repairing it was that the house was about 100yrs old and apparently they used wider planks than they use now and to repair/replace pieces in mid-room required pulling pieces from the back of the closet to use as the mid room pieces and then replacing the closet pieces with the narrower new pieces. It also was good method to help match it all up where you'd see it in the middle of the room.
  9. Lakee911

    Lakee911 I&C Engineer (mostly WWTP)

    Messages:
    1,328
    Location:
    Columbus, OH
    Thanks all! I like the fir a lot. I'm nervous about pulling up all the carpet downstairs only to discover that the oak is way beyond repair though. We'll see.

    Thanks,
    Jason
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