Hair salon plumbing question

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by Vogue, Mar 14, 2009.

  1. Vogue

    Vogue New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    ME
    I am looking into leasing office space to convert the existing offices into private hair salon suites. Each office suite will have its own hair salon sink installed. This model is different from most salons since normally the sinks are shared by all stylist and located in one area. With this model each stylist will have a private office with styling chair, sink , hair dryer ect.

    I have received a quote from a contractor and want to make sure I know exactly what all the plumbing requirements are for hair salons and any other plumbing concerns that I should be aware of before signing the lease.

    I will need to have 10 sinks installed and plumbing to hook up a washing machine. Currently there are 2 bathrooms and a kitchen area with plumbing but I was told that existing plumbing can't be leveraged because there is no basement. They would need to break through the concrete and install drains then have them inspected by the town. Then they would hang plumbing on the walls using plastic piping.

    1) Does this sound like the most cost effective solution or would there be alternative options?

    2)Is there anything thing I should know to ensure I don't run into trouble with approvals from the town?

    3) Are there special requirements for installing plumbing with hair salons vs oridnary commercial plumbing? One contractor mentioned I may need a separate system for disposing of chemicals (i.e.) hair color.
  2. Cass

    Cass Plumber

    Messages:
    5,980
    Location:
    Ohio
    Submit the plans for approval by the required county/city offices and have them stamped. Then get a price from a plumber based on the stamped plans and have a specific completion date added to the contract with a daily reduction of a specific amt. of $$$ until the job is complete. Have all the $$$ placed in escrow with the payment being made after final inspection. There is many times a bonus also added if the completion date is met...

    They shouldn't stamp the plans unless all requirements are met...
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2009
  3. nhmaster

    nhmaster Master Plumber

    Messages:
    3,189
    Location:
    S. Maine
    Thust your plumber. It's his job to know the right way to do things. That's why we get the big bucks.
  4. Vogue

    Vogue New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Location:
    ME
    Thanks for the advice. I will ask the contractor to draft of the plans so we can submit them to the town. I am concerned with the timeline of getting everthing done in four weeks because you never know what could happen with the town so having this in a contract is good.
    The contractor wants to get paid 50% for the job upfront then the remaining at completion. Is that normal to get upfront money?
  5. SewerRatz

    SewerRatz Illinois Licensed Plumber

    Messages:
    1,706
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    It is perfectly normal. Some contractors ask for a third down a third after the rough-in inspection and the last on completion of the job.
  6. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,245
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Oh, yeah?

    quote; Then get a price from a plumber based on the stamped plans and have a specific completion date added to the contract with a daily reduction of a specific amt. of $$$ until the job is complete. Have all the $$$ placed in escrow with the payment being made after final inspection.

    That is a good way to not get any bids for a job this small. The performance requirement would be on the general contractor doing the actual construction, not the plumber working under him, who might have absolutely no control over how fast walls are replaced/installed or anything involved with the job's critcical path. The major difference between a sink and a shampoo basin, in fact about the only one, is the requirement for a hair trap under the basin. Floors will have to be excavated and the drain lines extended to the sink locations, along with water lines. The hot water heater will have to be checked to ensure that it is adequate for the needs. Unless appearance is not a factor, the pipes should be placed inside the walls. There are many factors, such as venting, which would be determined by your codes and the building department.
  7. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego

    In California, the maximum amount a contractor can take for a down payment is 10% of the contract, or $1000, whichever is LESS.
    Then you can specify progress payments, and payments for material delivery. MAKE SURE that when you make material payments, you get a lien release every time. Shady contractors could take your payment, no pay the supplier, and the supplier files a mechanics lien on YOU>
  8. Cass

    Cass Plumber

    Messages:
    5,980
    Location:
    Ohio
    I ran into a guy that had a bunch of commercial work done and he got into an argument with the contractor and because the contractor didn't get what he wanted he stretched out a 2 week job into 3 months...there was nothing the owner could do...
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2009
  9. Marisela

    Marisela New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Rialto CA
    Back Wash sink

    Hello I was wondering if i could install a backwash system without cutting the concrete. Is it possible to hook it up against the wall to existing pipeing? Is this costly?
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