Gutted bathroom, new subfloor+tile = flange too high 1 1/2inch above floor

Discussion in 'Toilet Forum discussions' started by derekscissorhands, Apr 17, 2011.

  1. derekscissorhands

    derekscissorhands New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Georgia
    I gutted my bathroom, removed two subfloors, and then installed a new subfloor, hardibacker, and tile. Now the toilet flange is 1 1/2 inch above the floor. I'm going to attempt to attach a photo. What are my options? This renovation has milked us dry. This is basically the last problem we've encountered-didn't expect to have to gut out the floor and replace. I'm hoping to do this as cheap as possible, but of course I want to do it right. I appreciate the experts' opinions!
    Derek

    derek_324.jpg
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 18, 2011
  2. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,004
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    You will have to at least cut what you have flush with the floor.
    I can't tell from the picture whether you will be able to glue a new flange inside or outside of what you have.
  3. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,349
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    This may be a DIY job depending on your abilities. Otherwise, you need a plumber to remove what you have and install a new flange at the proper level. As long it has to be done, be sure to do it or have it done right. As Terry said, you can't tell from the picture if you can use an inside or outside flange. It doesn't appear to be a 3" pipe, but if it is, do not use an inside fitting flange, it will cut the diameter of the drain too much. OK on a 4" pipe. The proper setting for a flange is resting on top of the finished floor and anchored through the floor into the sub flooring. I like #12 stainless steel screws of sufficient length to penetrate at least 1/2 of the sub floor. The new flange should not be PVC or ABS, and it should have a stainless steel ring. These cost a little more, but are fair superior to others.
  4. derekscissorhands

    derekscissorhands New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Georgia
    What is the best way to cut the pipe in this situation?
  5. derekscissorhands

    derekscissorhands New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Georgia
    More pics

    I went ahead and took a couple more pictures to give you a better idea of what I'm working with. I truly appreciate your suggestions. :confused:

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  6. Jerome2877

    Jerome2877 In the Trades

    Messages:
    397
    Location:
    BC
    It looks to me that the flange is glued directly into a 90. I doubt you will have enough room to cut down and install a new flange if that is the case. Is this on slab or could you access from below?
  7. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    It looks to me like the flange is glued outside a street closet ell. I would try to cut the flange as high up as possible, then make VERTICAL slices on the flange hub, and try to peel the chunks off.
  8. derekscissorhands

    derekscissorhands New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Georgia
    Below is another bathroom. The plumber who installed the shower base drain already had to cut out some of the ceiling below for that. I don't mind cutting out more if necessary. If I can access from below, what do you suggest? I'm nervous about doing anything with it. However, I can't afford to have a pro come over-probably not for a few months (big dentist bill for son to pay). So, it's up to me or we have to put it off even longer. I'll put it off if I need to, but if it's something I could reasonably do myself without messing it up, I'd like to try. Thanks!
  9. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,349
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    If you have access from below, you might just open the ceiling and cut the pipe and get rid of the old flange, connection and all. Then go with a PVC coupler on the pipe and add new pieces to the flange. In many ways, a large patch in drywall is not too much more difficult than a small one. You have to cut a patch, nail it in, tape it, mud it, sand, and paint no matter the size.
  10. derekscissorhands

    derekscissorhands New Member

    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    Georgia
    What is the best way to cut it?
  11. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,006
    Location:
    New England
    Depends somewhat on how much room you have. Most saws will cut it easily if you have room. They do make a rope saw, and even a string can get hot enough to melt through it.
  12. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,349
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    Most hardware and discount plumbing stores have a PVC cutter that is a small cable with handles on each end. These "saw" through PVC pretty easily and you can keep a reasonably straight cut, but as noted, most any saw will cut PVC.
  13. cwhyu2

    cwhyu2 Consultant

    Messages:
    1,347
    Location:
    Cincinnati OH
    It looks to me that the flange was glued onto a street 90,but just barely,I cut out the street 90 and replace it, cut the horizontal pipe and hope that it is low enough that when you install the new flange it will sit on top of the finished floor.you will need a 3 in coupling,3in st90 3in pipe .
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