Gorilla glue/ spout question

Discussion in 'Shower & Bathtub Forum & Blog' started by Chuckalutes, Aug 20, 2013.

  1. Chuckalutes

    Chuckalutes New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Can gorilla glue bind a copper pipe and a nipple pipe coming out of the wall that attaches a bathtub spout. I had to cut of the tip of the nipple pipe that the spout comes out of because the old one was either to corroded or soldered on. It is a spout with a divider. Will it be able to handle the pressure of the shower and heat? If not what other adhesive can I use to bind them (except soldering)
    Thank you
  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,262
    Location:
    New England
    A pipe nipple has two ends...why not just unscrew it from the fitting in the wall and replace the nipple with a new one? There's no reliable way to glue pipe like this together. The diverter puts pressure on things when engaged. A picture of what you really have may offer some other suggestions.
  3. Smooky

    Smooky Member

    Messages:
    626
    Location:
    NC
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 21, 2013
  4. Chuckalutes

    Chuckalutes New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    New Jersey
    jadnashua- would I need to shut the water off before attempting to take it off and I'm pretty sure the other flair is corroded as well how would you suggest to remove it.
  5. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,034
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    You are trying to describe something using a description that does not mean anything to us. A picture would help, but the short answer is that there is NOTHING that will glue the spout to the pipe, and soldering is probably NOT the proper method either. Your first mistake was cutting the pipe when you did not know how you were going to put the thing back together with a cut pipe.
  6. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,034
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    quote; Maybe you need a new or a different type of spout.

    What a dork! All he needed was a spout with the threads at the front of the spout, which the majority of "big box" replacement spouts DO have.
  7. Chuckalutes

    Chuckalutes New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Hj- the spout thread and the thread of the nipple was put in over 15 years ago. It was soldered and the corrosion was horrible. I was trying to get it off for a week straight and nothing. So I cut it and I thought I had a piece that would fit perfect but it did not. I do have nipple pipes I just need to know how to put on in if you can please help. Sure it was a mistake but if you discovered the corrosion on the inside of it you would want to replace it
  8. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,295
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    We need a picture.
    Based on what you are saying, we still don't know if it's copper or galvanized pipe.

    800 pixels or less.

    If it's a galvanized nipple, thread a new one on.
    If it's copper pipe, solder on whatever you need for the new spout w/diverter.
  9. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,262
    Location:
    New England
    As to whether you need to turn the water off to unscrew a tub spout nipple, no. Water only comes out when you have the valve to the tub/shower on, so there's no water there with the valve off. But, a picture of what you really have would be a good starting point.

    FWIW, it probably was NOT soldered on, but corrosion can make it look like that. A bigger wrench probably would have gotten it off. SOmetimes, it can take a lot of force. If the pipe is galvanized, replace it with brass and your corrosion problem goes away should you still live there when it comes time to change it again.
  10. Chuckalutes

    Chuckalutes New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    New Jersey
    jadnashua- you might be right about it not being soldered on. The only reason I am thinking that it was is because my grandfather put it in so who knows what he used. Believe me I did try to use channel locks and wrenches but nothing would work. It is galvanized so how would I take the nipple off? Do I just turn it counter clockwise because I suspect there is a corrosion problem there as well.
  11. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,262
    Location:
    New England
    With few exceptions, they only use right-handed threads in plumbing, so yes, you would turn the nipple counter-clockwise to remove it. Depending on if there is caulk, grout, or whatnot around the pipe (and dried out pipe dope can be tough to loosen, too), it may take some force to remove it. A pipe wrench is your friend here, and leverage is the key. The only gotcha is if the fitting in the wall isn't anchored well. A new nipple will need some pipe dope on it to make the seal. Make sure it all doesn't get wiped off when inserting it into the hole in the wall before it gets to the fitting!

    Is that wall an outside wall, or backing up to another room? Worse case, you'd need to open the wall behind it to fix something, but often, that isn't necessary.
  12. Chuckalutes

    Chuckalutes New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    New Jersey
    jadnashua-The pipe is also leaking a small amount of water but it has been doing this for a while before I even began to remove it. Will replacing the spout nipple also stop the leaking or is there something else to stop it? And the backing wall leads to another room.
  13. Chuckalutes

    Chuckalutes New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Btw the handles are also corroded and I have attempted to take them off with no luck. The screws are stuck in there.
  14. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,262
    Location:
    New England
    The tub spout is just an open tube from the outlet of the valve. If it constantly leaks, it has nothing to do with the spout, but it is the valve. While many of them still have repair parts available, if it is really old, it may be prudent to consider replacing it with a new valve that meets current codes, and while in there, get rid of any of the old galvanized piping.
  15. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,384
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    Lots of old fixture like this can be repaired, but as you have found already, this is not always a simple task. Using a real big pipe wrench may give you the torque need to break the joint loose, but it could just as easy (probably easier) twist pipe and ruin the whole installation. Jim's suggestion about a new fixture that meets modern code and getting rid of any galvanized pipes would be a wise choice.
  16. asktom

    asktom Member

    Messages:
    588
    Location:
    Victor, MT
    We need a picture.
  17. Chuckalutes

    Chuckalutes New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    New Jersey
    One last question can I hit the handles with a hammer to break it off. I know it doesnt sound right but the screws are corroded shut. Is there any other way to get the screws off?
  18. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,295
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    If you do that.............be prepared to shut down the entire house and to be out of water until it's fixed.
    That's mighty risky.
  19. Chuckalutes

    Chuckalutes New Member

    Messages:
    11
    Location:
    New Jersey
    That's why I don't want to do it so how do I get the screws off
  20. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,295
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    I'm just saying that we know where the house shutoff is before we do anything like that.
    And we're prepared to replace the entire valve if needed. It's sometimes quicker to assume that the valve will be junked and replaced if it's that old.

    But then, we haven't seen any pictures, so it's just a shot in the dark.


    [​IMG]

    We sometimes replace the old valve and start over.
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2013

Share This Page