gas stove supply line replacement

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by Mazcar, Mar 29, 2013.

  1. Mazcar

    Mazcar New Member

    Messages:
    13
    Location:
    TX
    Hi All,

    I am trying to replace a 36" gas supply line for my stove with a 60" line.

    I just purchased a Brasscraft "Coated Stainless Steel Gas Connector" kit with a 5/8" OD in 60" length to replace the gas supply line for my stove.

    The instructions are a bit murky. So, I am hoping that some of the vets will provide some tips.

    When I removed the old hose from the stove and from the gas supply from the wall, I was left with a hose with two female ends. The new hose also has two female beveled ends, but included two adapters that made it have two male ends (non beveled). One of the two new identical adapters is shown on the edge of the stove in the second picture.

    When I unscrewed the hose from the stove, the old adapter stayed screwed into a gizmo that looks like some regulator or something. Should I leave it alone and use that old adapter with my new hose, for fear of damaging something by removing the adapter from that stove part? I did read a post where a guy cracked his regulator.

    If you tell me to remove that adapter and use the new one, how best should I prepare the adapter?
    I think that the instructions tell me to put pipe dope onto the adapter side that screws into the stove, but to not put anything on the beveled side that screws into the new hose. Is that correct? However, I did read on a post on this forum that I should avoid dope on the threads, but to put a little on the actual beveled surface. Is that correct? If I just use the adapters already screwed in place, do I clean the threads with a scotch-brite pad or with acetone?

    I have pretty much the same questions regarding the connection at the gas valve at the wall. When I removed the old hose, I saw what appears to be a high quality looking brass male connector at the end of the gas valve coming out of the wall. I suppose I could remove that adapter and replace it with the new one from the kit, but the male adapter at the wall looks like it has been doing the job for the last forty years. Should I just leave it alone? It is a beveled edge male connector that would match perfectly with my new hose's beveled edge female connector. Would I use NO pipe dope there?

    Everything was pretty freakin' tight. Is that the correct torque specification?

    So, in summary, should I replace ONLY the hose and reuse the adapters that are already screwed in place, clean the threads really well, and only use a thin layer of dope on the beveled surfaces, and crank down really tightly?

    I am enclosing two pictures so to help illustrate the situation.

    Thanks

    Attached Files:

  2. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,815
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    If the "hose" has the same size adapters, just put some pipe compound on the beveled faces and screw the new connector onto them. Do not "scour" the beveled ends, they are fine just the way they are.
  3. ckl111

    ckl111 Home Builder

    Messages:
    65
    Location:
    Ontario
    Follow the instructions that came with the kit. You only use GAS APPROVED pipe dope on the male threads screwing the adapters into the shut off and the regulator. Don't use regular plumbing dope; the gas can react with it.

    DO NOT use any pipe dope at all on the flared (beveled) end of the adapter and couplings. Not on the threads nor the bevelled surface. The flare on the adapter and the corresponding coupling on the gas connector is what forms the gas seal. Pipe dope contaminates this seal and can act like a lubricant on the threads that can loosen the connection over time. "Everything was pretty freakin' tight" and it is supposed to be. The last thing you want is a loose gas connection.

    You can usually reuse the old adapters but from the pictures, it looks like your adapters have been contaminated by pipe dope on the flared ends. I would replace them if it were me. Just make sure to use a properly sized wrench on either side of the connection when loosening and tightening and you shouldn't damage the shut off or regulator.

    Make sure to use liquid leak detector on all the connections after you are finished to check for leaks. Gas is one thing I take a lot of precautions with. A leaky faucet may cause water damage but a leaky gas fitting can blow your house up.

    http://0323c7c.netsolhost.com/docs/Flexible%20Connector%20for%20appliance.pdf
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2013
  4. asktom

    asktom Member

    Messages:
    575
    Location:
    Victor, MT
    I'm with HJ.
  5. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,815
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    cki111's final recommendation is the only valid one as far as I am concerned and this is after 60+ years in the business without EVER blowing anything up. I don't know where you would find a "gas approved" pipe joint compound which as not also a "common" one used on EVERY type of connection.
  6. ckl111

    ckl111 Home Builder

    Messages:
    65
    Location:
    Ontario
    I don't know about the rest of North America but around here you can get a cheaper pipe dope that is not approved for gas fittings. http://www.gfthompson.com/index.php/masters/masters-no-leak-detail

    You are right that the "gas approved" pipe dope can be used for EVERY thing else but the cheaper stuff cannot be used for Gas. At the local Home Depot, the gas approved stuff is double the price. http://www.gfthompson.com/index.php/masters/masters-pipe-thread-sealants-detail

    To add to the misinformation, some stores or their websites say a particular pipe dope is suitable for natural gas but a check of the manufacturers web site shows it is not recommended for gas.

    I don't know what you normally use but I just wanted people to be aware there can be a difference. Just read the label.

    If you want to use T-tape, there is "Gas Approved" T-Tape too. Around here, it's yellow for easy identification.
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2013
  7. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,815
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    quote; If you want to use T-tape,

    In the first place there is NO approved "T-tape". Second, there is no way any competent person would use TPFE tape on a flared joint. In addition, once a flare joint is compressed. the gas CANNOT react with it, if it even it could do that normally.
  8. ckl111

    ckl111 Home Builder

    Messages:
    65
    Location:
    Ontario
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2013
  9. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,119
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    T-Tape is only used on tapered threading.

    Not for compression or flares.
  10. ckl111

    ckl111 Home Builder

    Messages:
    65
    Location:
    Ontario
    I never meant to suggest using T-tape on a flared joint. NOTHING should be used on a flared gas connection. Neither pipe dope nor T-tape.
  11. asktom

    asktom Member

    Messages:
    575
    Location:
    Victor, MT
    Actually, that flare joint will work just fine with no pipe dope at all. Nothing would certainly be better than a PTFE mummywrap, and, in my opinion, the dope is optional. I don't know where you would find a pipe joint compound that would be problematic, should you choose to use it.
  12. NCHomeowner

    NCHomeowner New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Durham, NC
    Thanks for an incredibly informative discussion. I was wondering if anyone knew any tricks of the trade to REMOVE pipe dope / pipe joint compound from the threads of a flare joint? I am trying to detach a flexible gas pipe from the gas line and whoever installed the fitting didn't want anyone removing it because it is sealed on TIGHT! I'm careful not to put too much torque for fear of loosening the gas line on the other side of the stop valve, but I've put quite a bit of elbow grease into trying to dislodge this joint with no success at all. Any hints you could provide?
  13. kreemoweet

    kreemoweet New Member

    Messages:
    371
    Location:
    Seattle. WA
    Pipe fittings generally require the use of TWO wrenches to install and remove. In your case, a large adjustable wrench on the valve, and similarly on the
    flare nut you're trying to detach. Afterward, mineral spirits and a small wire brush will take off that nasty pipe dope some misguided soul applied to the flare joint.
  14. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,815
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    The "pipe dope" is NOT the reason it is so tight, but just use two wrenches and some elbow grease and it will come apart.
  15. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,132
    Location:
    New England
    A flared fitting works because the two facings are carefully shaped to mate with no gaps...the threads just push those two surfaces together and, unlike on a tapered fitting, has nothing to do with actually sealing except to provide the force to push the sealing surfaces together. With some of the not-so-great products out there, those facings may not be perfect. A small amount of pipe dope on the face will do the same thing it does on a tapered fitting...fill in any gap. It doesn't hurt, it can help. Just don't glob lots of it all around, and there is no need for any on the threads of a flared fitting.
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