1. statjunk

    statjunk DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    542
    Hey guys,

    I was helping my buddy with a valve install last night and I noticed that he was using a different kind of flux.

    He was using the Oatey with the green label. It is called No 95 Tinning Flux. I always use the one in the red container, I believe called the No 5.

    What is the difference between these two?

    Thanks

    Tom
  2. Cass

    Cass Plumber

    Messages:
    5,980
    Location:
    Ohio
    The #95 is a pre tinning flux. As it heats it leaves a lite coating of tin on the fitting and pipe. This helps with the capilary action of the solder. I use it.
  3. statjunk

    statjunk DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    542
    Should I start using it?

    Are there any down sides to it?

    Thanks

    Tom
  4. frenchie

    frenchie Jack of all trades

    Grumpy will mock you... but I think that's about it.

    ;)
  5. statjunk

    statjunk DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    542
    LOL! He mocks everyone so what's new. He usually has a good point though.

    So what is the deal. Should I switch?

    Tom
  6. frenchie

    frenchie Jack of all trades

    Apparently the self-tinning is easier, and some of the pro's use it (Rugged, for one)

    Not sure what (if any) disadvantages are.

    I only learned about it recently, here: check out the "how to solder" thread...
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2007
  7. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,995
    Location:
    New England
    My guess is that it probably costs a little more and may be harder to find at a big box store.
  8. got_nailed

    got_nailed DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    277
    I use #95 part of the time. I got it by accident or something and I haven’t run out yet so I still use it. I feel that flux is flux (as long as it is made for plumbing.
  9. Basement_Lurker

    Basement_Lurker One who lurks

    Messages:
    668
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    The big deal of Oatey 95 flux is that it won't turn the pipe green afterwards, while the regular fluxes will if they are not cleaned off sufficiently. The #95 flux costs me about 5x as much as the regular stuff, so I just use it on exposed piping, and use the regular stuff on piping that will be enclosed. The product description claims that the #95 flux will never burn away (unlike the #5 flux), which is a definite advantage, especially for soldering novices.
  10. markts30

    markts30 Commercial Plumber

    Messages:
    630
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    I use Coppermate flux and silvabrite solder and never have had a problem (that was not my own fault - LOL).
    [​IMG]
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2007
  11. GrumpyPlumber

    GrumpyPlumber Licensed Grump

    Messages:
    1,404
    Location:
    Licensed Grump
    I'd never!
    Well...maybe


    Tinning flux is fer wimps...where can I get some?
    Seriously I just wonder if it isn't something intended to appeal to those who don't have alot of experience with soldering...though admittedly if Rugged uses it..I might try it...just maybe...shhh..I didn't say that.


    I SWEAR by Silvabrite...it's the ONLY solder I'll use.
  12. GrumpyPlumber

    GrumpyPlumber Licensed Grump

    Messages:
    1,404
    Location:
    Licensed Grump
    Give Nokorode a try and get back to me.
  13. kordts

    kordts In the Trades

    Messages:
    551
    Location:
    exurban Chicago
    I use No-Korrode and whatever solder I buy on ****. If you sand the pipe, use a fitting brush on the hubs and stir the flux, you won't have a leak except once in a blue moon.
  14. BAPlumber

    BAPlumber Plumber

    Messages:
    227
    Location:
    Vashon, Washington
    I've used Oatey and NoKorode. I think Everflux is hands down the winner of the water solubles. Laco was always good.
  15. got_nailed

    got_nailed DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    277
    Ok I got a small tub of Nokorode and I’ll use it this weekend.

    I do think this is going to come down to 50 of one and 50 of another. Everyone will say that one is better than another. The reason that I could give a rats as about what type of flux I get is my g/f dose my ordering and keeps up with my stock. What I get is what I get. I have used a few that I hope I never use again and I told her I didn’t like them.

    But as it has been said if you prep the pipe right then it should work just fine. I will say that the final look of the job can be affected somewhat by the flux until you get used to it. For me if I pick up some that I’m not used to my first 3 or 4 don’t always look the greatest but after that they look fine.

    I’ll let you know how I like the Nokorode next week.
  16. GrumpyPlumber

    GrumpyPlumber Licensed Grump

    Messages:
    1,404
    Location:
    Licensed Grump
    Cool...though it doesn't make that big a difference like you said, it's really the solder itself that makes or breaks it.
    Also...HOW did you get yer G/F to help you?!?!
    I'd like to know...geesh would be nice if I could get the mrs to help me!!
  17. got_nailed

    got_nailed DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    277
    My g/f dose not work. She keeps up with what I have in stock and doing all of my paper work. Well her job is to keep me working. She is trying to get me to quit my night job and do plumbing full time and to start doing more repair work.

    Currently I mostly work on the weekends on new construction. I have 2GC’s that keep me going. The one thing that the GC’s love is that I do most of my work on the weekends; so I can come in and get out with out being in the way. The only thing that kills me is if the HVAC is already installed (this has happened one time on me). The power cables running all over the place is not bad. The crew that dose there houses will not wire the bathrooms and part of the kitchens until I’m done with my ruff in.
  18. GrumpyPlumber

    GrumpyPlumber Licensed Grump

    Messages:
    1,404
    Location:
    Licensed Grump
    Do what I did...line up as much work as you can for your vacation....see how it works out...also see if you can line up more future work.
    I went on "vacation" a few years ago...put in my 2 weeks notice when I came back and have been going ever since.
    I NEVER took work from the company I worked for...just started getting more and more calls..to the point that there wasn't enough time weekends/nights to keep up.
    Made DAM sure I had a sizeable nest-egg first though.
  19. statjunk

    statjunk DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    542
    Grumpy,

    It's funny that you bring this up. My buddy and I were having this conversation not long ago. Before I started flipping houses I dreamed of one day semi-retiring from my day job and just flip a house a year to keep money in my pockets and maintain a reasonable life style. The problem I see is health insurance.

    How do you break away on your own, doing dangerous work, and afford health insurance. My buddy pays nearly $15k for his family.

    I really don't have dreams of retiring early any more.

    Your thoughts?

    Tom
  20. got_nailed

    got_nailed DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    277
    My real job is working at an auto plant. My biggest thing is health insurance. If I could get heath insurance for a decent cost I would quit my job and just do plumbing.
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