Fitting a T in a horizontal run of PVC

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by ehlinn, Feb 7, 2005.

  1. ehlinn

    ehlinn New Member

    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    Maryland
    I have a problem, and I hope some pros out there know a trick. How do you deal with putting a T in a run of 4 inch PVC drain that has little or no play in any direction. I can cut out the section of pipe needed to fit the T, but I can't move the pipe enough to allow the T to swallow the existing pipe.

    Are there any tricks to use here?
  2. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,334
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    There are a couple of ways. They make a coupling device that requires a small section of pipe to be removed. One end of the coupler then "glues" onto one end of the pipe. The other end of the coupler slides within the body of the coupler and "glues" to the remaining pipe. Works well and there is some latitude in the space. I've never used one on 4", but I have used them to repair 3/4" sprinkler lines quite successfully. In a non-pressurized system, you could use a no-hub connector.
  3. ehlinn

    ehlinn New Member

    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    Maryland
    Are these coupling devices easy to find?
  4. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,519
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    tee

    Yes, but what are you using the tee for? Most applications cannot use a tee in a horizontal pipe.
  5. ehlinn

    ehlinn New Member

    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    Maryland
    I need to run a 1.5 inch tub drain into the horizontal pipe. The old tub drain with T is already there, but I am installing a smaller tub so I have to move the drain over about foot. The large horizontal pipe runs perpendicular to the floor joists and is at the top of a wall. I was going to cap off the old T and install a new one about 1 foot over. That way my tub drain can run between joists and I won't have to cut holes through them.

    I hope this makes sense. It is difficult to explain. Was my old plumbing done wrong? It was done that way by the builder.

    Thanks,

    Eric
  6. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,519
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    tee

    If it was really a "tee" and not a fitting that just had a 90 degree inlet, then it was wrong and you cannot use that fitting. Besides, you are not mentioning anything about a vent that should be between the "tee" and the trap. If there is none, then the builder did the entire thing wrong and I would suspect that it was not the only thing done the "easy" way.
  7. ehlinn

    ehlinn New Member

    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    Maryland
    I think I will try to take a picture of what is there now. The horizontal run has the shower drain running into it, which is vented. Then about 3 feet down the tub drain runs into the horizontal run with a t, but no vent then about 4 feet from there the batroom sink runs into the horizontal run. I believe the sinks are vented. I was surprised we never had problems with the tub draining being unvented. Did the plumber just figure it was close enough to the shower vent? How could this have passed inspection?

    Thanks,

    Eric
  8. ehlinn

    ehlinn New Member

    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    Maryland
    Here is a pic of the tub drain running into the T on the large horizontal line. Hj, I have 2 other pictures but they are too large to post here. Maybe if you get a chance to look at them I could email them to you.

    Also, the big drain is 3", not 4".

    Attached Files:

  9. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,334
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    Pardon me for butting in here, but I don't see a trap. If there is no trap from the tub to the drain, you have more problems than fitting a tee. I would suggest you contact a plumber to come in and straighten out this mess before it gets worse.
  10. RioHyde

    RioHyde Plumber

    Messages:
    339
    Location:
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    The fitting pictured is the wrong one for the job. You need a wye and an eighth bend. In most places you cannot lay a tee on its back (Kentucky is the only place I know of that you can, but I'm sure there are other exceptions). Also, Gary is right. I dont see a trap either. Perhaps it just isnt in the picture? :confused:
  11. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,519
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    pipe

    What I see is incorrect, and there may be more problems that we cannot see, such as where is the trap.
  12. ehlinn

    ehlinn New Member

    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    Maryland
    A plumber did all of this in the first place. This is all original, inspected plumbing. The plumbing inspection sticker is posted on my breaker box.

    There is a trap, it is about 4 feet from the fitting. It is difficult to see, but at the top of the T is an elbow that comes out of the page.

    Can the wye lay on its back?

    Is there any reason why I can't correct all of this myself?
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2005
  13. ehlinn

    ehlinn New Member

    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    Maryland
    Any responses to my last post?
  14. RioHyde

    RioHyde Plumber

    Messages:
    339
    Location:
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Yes, you can lay a wye on its back and you can repair this yourself if you're pretty handy. Cut out the tee, solvent weld the eighth bend into the wye making a "combo" or tee-wye, line up the combo fitting and measure how much 3" PVC you need for each side of the tee, solvent weld these pieces in, use two 3" slip couplings for the repair. You could also use banded couplings for the repair, but I personally like using the slip couplings.

    Good luck! :D
  15. ehlinn

    ehlinn New Member

    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    Maryland
    Thanks Riohyde. I have done a lot of carpentry, and general plumbing repair, but this is my first bathroom remodel. I want to do it all right the first time. Just so I have this straight, the slip couplings do not have a ridge on the inside to allow them to seat on the end of the pipe? I can slide them all the way over the pipe so I can install my wye then slide them back over the joint?

    I need to find the slip couplings somewhere. Do you know of anyplace on the internet. My home depot does not have any.

    Thanks again,

    Eric
  16. RioHyde

    RioHyde Plumber

    Messages:
    339
    Location:
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    No Eric, Home Depot doesnt carry slip couplings. Belive me, I needed one desperately one night and the local HD that was open 24/7 couldnt help me out. In fact, they didnt know what one was.....hmmmm....whats that tell you? lol

    Anyway, any of your local plumbing supply houses should have slip couplings. You're right, they have no ridge/stop in them and will slide completely over the pipe. If you use them, be sure to mark the pipe so that when you slide the coupling over the two ends you get it centered. With slip couplings you have to work fast.....mess up and you'll be cutting more pipe out to fix what you messed up.

    There really isnt anything wrong with banded couplings at all. In fact, in thinking your situation over as I'm writing this post, I'm leaning more towards recommending that you use them instead of the slip couplings. The reasoning is that they allow for more of a "fudge factor". If it isnt quite right you can always loosend the band to make adjustments. Not to call your plumbing skills into question, but they would be a bit easier to use for a DIYer and here at least they are approved fittings.

    Good luck and keep us updated on your progress.
  17. ehlinn

    ehlinn New Member

    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    Maryland
    Just so I know, the banded couplings are rubber with a metal "band" around them, and the band has a flange with bolts through it? You don't mean the Fernco couplings with pipe clamps, right?

    Thanks again. I will let you know how I make out with all of this.
  18. RioHyde

    RioHyde Plumber

    Messages:
    339
    Location:
    Cincinnati, Ohio
    Thats right. The band is as wide as the rubber beneath. Just ask for them at the plumbing supply house. Two 3" PVC X PVC banded couplings aka "proflex".
  19. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,519
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    bands

    There are two different kinds. One has a gear hose clamp at each end the other has hose clamps with bolts at each end. But both have a metal sleeve that the clamps fit over.
  20. ehlinn

    ehlinn New Member

    Messages:
    26
    Location:
    Maryland
    Thanks again guys.

    Eric
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