epoxy retention tank

Discussion in 'Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog' started by ugabulldog, Jan 16, 2011.

  1. ugabulldog

    ugabulldog New Member

    Messages:
    62
    Location:
    Northeast GA
    I will be having a tank installed on a new home I am building and am thinking of using an epoxy retention tank instead of a bladder tank so I can add chemical free oxygen filter if needed later to treat iron in water? Should this type of tank be ok as opposed to bladder?

    Just be clearer, I think the chemical free system i am referring to injects ait into the line and has sand as a filter.....
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2011
  2. ballvalve

    ballvalve General Engineering Contractor

    Messages:
    3,261
    Location:
    northfork, california
    I know you guys will think I am nuts, but the best and cheapest plain well tank, is a water heater. Its insulated, has an anode for long life and lots of ports to work with.

    Would likely work for treatment retention as well, but I am not versed [thank god] in drinking water chemical adjustments.

    Its a real shame that glass lined well tanks and epoxy tanks do not have an anode. You would get an extra ten years, but the MFG. does not want you to know. I'm going to add a spare one to a sears glasslined and see how it holds up - if I live long enough for it to rust out.
  3. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,495
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    Anything with ports in the top will lose air. Gotta have a good air charge system to make it work. Nothing wrong with epoxy. Although they also make fiberglass retention tanks that will never rust out.
  4. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    Using a pressure tank of any kind as a retention tank for an oxidization type water treatment system is a bad idea because the oxidation (air/oxygen, ozone, chlorine, peroxide) usually causes dirty water and the 'dirt' must be filtered out before use.

    So you are much farther ahead simply using a regular pressure tank and an oxidizing/turbidity filter after the pressure tank because as you say, you need a filter anyway. Using air/oxygen to treat water quality problems requires an off gas (vent) type tank and air is the poorest type of oxidizer and usually isn't used for the removal of iron. An oxidizing Iron filter is the best choice, an air pump type uses both in one piece of equipment, depending on the type of iron and the volume of ferrous iron, and other water chemistry such as the pH, the presence of H2S and backwash gpm etc..
  5. ugabulldog

    ugabulldog New Member

    Messages:
    62
    Location:
    Northeast GA
    gary, do you have a link to one you are refferiing to so i can be clearer? thanks......
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2011
  6. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    I was referring to various types of equipment but specifically mentioned air pump systems, a number of companies make them but... for iron they aren't that good and can be overkill compared to iron removal mineral filters, which there are a number that are used; birm, greensand, filox etc. etc.. Most have limitations based on your water chemistry, which I don't know. You should rely on the suggestions a dealer that you have given all the info about your water problems to.
  7. ugabulldog

    ugabulldog New Member

    Messages:
    62
    Location:
    Northeast GA
    It is my understanding that deep wells (mine is 300') have to have oxygen added to them in order for the BERM filter to be effective. If this is true, then I guess what I meant in my original question, (after doing more research) is; after the air injection, can a conventional tank with two ports be used as opposed to a bladder tank, and then go to the berm filter tank....basically eliminating the need for one tank?
  8. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    That's birm, and it requires minimum of 15% DO (dissolved oxygen) in the water to work but, the depth of the well is not how you decide if the water has the DO content birm requires. You have a water test done for DO content.

    Air injection is a poor choice because you need a venturi (injector) and rust forms inside the pipe right at and past the venturi blocking the pipe over time. Thtat starves teh filter for the proper gpm for successful backwash and the filter fails prematurely.

    If you have 3 or more gpg of hardness, a softener is the best choice to remove up to 5 ppm of iron. You would use a resin cleaner like Iron Out once every month or two.

    A proper vent tank has a float controlled vent outlet and the tank doesn't have to be any larger than the filter tank but, it should be able to drain from the bottom to flush the rust out every month or two.
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