Eliminate S drain and vent question

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by Master Brian, Jan 16, 2009.

  1. Master Brian

    Master Brian DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    368
    Location:
    Kansas
    I recently remodeled my bathroom and I admit, some of the plumbing was a quick job, to get the bath back up and running after 2 months of being torn apart. (I have a 3 y/o whom doesn't care for showers and wanted her bathtub back!) When the plumbing was done, I had some obstacles to work around, so I did what I could and now am trying to clean it up and make certain it is done correct.

    I have tried to label the picture to make things clear. From my understanding what I have is an S trap for the tub. My plan is to get it correct and make it into a P trap. I plan to drop the vertical pipe, running into the P, down several inches to where it is inline (proper slope 1/4" p/f slope) with the 4x4x2 fitting. I illustrated this in the picture with a white line drawing. My question is, can I put a 90* fitting, running horizontal, off of the 4x4x2 or should I turn the 4x4x2 about 45* and have the run go straight in? The horizontal 90* bend would be right where the white * is in the picture. This would keep me from having to cut the pipe leading to the 4x4x2 and rotating it about 45*. Either way is fine, just less work if I can install the horizontal bend....

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Jan 16, 2009
  2. Master Brian

    Master Brian DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    368
    Location:
    Kansas
    Next part of this question is, do the 90's in the yellow circle cause any issues? Again at the time, I had to do this to get around some waterlines, etc. If need be, I can now go straight down. If it is ok, then I'll leave it, as I don't need more work.

    Are there any other clear issues with the plumbing that is shown? The other line in the pictue is the drain for the pedestal sink, it currently has an AAV venting it, so I didn't want it going into the 4" stack that the tub drains into.

    Thanks for any help, I will have a few more questions regarding this setup, but will wait until this is settled.

    Attached Files:

  3. Basement_Lurker

    Basement_Lurker One who lurks

    Messages:
    668
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    Your two 90s don't pose a problem other than impeding water flow. You are best to have two 45s there instead if you need to make the offset. However, it is best to just have the line drop straight down into the trap.

    Since you have a fernco fitting there, you can easily cut out that 4x4x2 san tee and glue on a new one and reposition it properly so your tub p-trap drains directly to it, and then reconnect your stack with the fernco and a short piece of 4".

    I hope you plan to support your pex lines better than what that picture shows. If you are planning to leave them hanging there like that, you should use metal bend supports.

    And just out of curiosity, is there any particular reason you like to use reducing bushings everywhere instead of an actual reducing fitting?
  4. Master Brian

    Master Brian DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    368
    Location:
    Kansas
    Good to know, that copper line is still in the way of a straight drop, but it will be gone, soon enough. That's when I could go to the straight drop, but I don't want to do extra work, just to do extra work. Right now the tub drains 10x faster than any tub I've had before. Maybe because I have 2" drain, where I believe 1-1/2" is the norm. I do get a gurgling, is all of this why?

    So that is better than putting in a 90* or 45* bend? Will do....

    Those are actually supported everywhere else pretty well, in fact there are the nailed in supports (like the 3/4" line has) right out of the picture. It's just right there they are lacking. I was wondering if I should install a bend support. I just couldn't do it until a few days ago, as I ordered a bunch online and they just came in a day or two ago. They are plastic, not metal. Does that matter?

    [qoute]And just out of curiosity, is there any particular reason you like to use reducing bushings everywhere instead of an actual reducing fitting?[/quote]
    I wondered if that would come up. The actual reason is two-fold. 1st the closest lumber yard doesn't have the reducing fittings and it's hard for me to get to the plumbing supply by 4:30 during the week. 2nd, I wasn't sure exactly how this all was going to go together until I started putting it together. That added to the fact, that the bushings were readily available and the actual fittings weren't made sense to me. I'm guessing there isn't a problem using them is there???
  5. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,347
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    You should replace the Fernco connecter with a banded coupler. What you have is no approved for above ground use. I see no problem with the bushings. It looks to me like when you finish fixing the problem area, you will have a good installation.
  6. Master Brian

    Master Brian DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    368
    Location:
    Kansas
    I didn't know that about the Fernco connecter, what are they for? Burried installations? If so, can I ask, why they are ok burried, but not above ground? When you say banded, I am assuming you are referring to the couplers with the corrogated (sp?) metall wrapping them. That's what I've always seen, but I thought an inspector, on my previous house, had told me they weren't legal and I kept hearing people talk about fernco this and that....

    Also, what is the difference between the two?

    Thanks!
  7. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,995
    Location:
    New England
    The rubber bushing in a no-hub is thinner, has a stop ridge in the middle, and is supported so any lateral pressure won't cause the pipes to become offset. Under ground, assuming you properly bed the pipes, it is supported and not hanging in air, so the thicker rubber connector doesn't offset.
  8. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,347
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    What Jim said plus, a Fernco sleeve uses a stainless steel clamp on each end and is to be used underground. For example, PVC pipe being joined to cast iron that is buried. You may have misunderstood what you were told or the person gave you wrong information. In real life, that Fernco will probably last forever and do a good job, but an inspector will not approve it.
  9. Master Brian

    Master Brian DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    368
    Location:
    Kansas
    Very possible it was a miscommunication, but thanks for clarifying.
  10. C NUMB

    C NUMB Plumbing Contractor

    Messages:
    135
    Location:
    NPR, FL
    Down here in my neck of the woods a no hub band is only legal on PVC as long as you use PVC no hub fitting adaptors. The fernco is used here whether under or above ground.


    Is there a reason to even have that san tee in the stack for the tub drain? Can't you just cut a wye in the 2" run on the sink waste line. Also, san tee's on there back as the one for the sink waste line are illegal in Florida, just an fyi if ya venture here.
  11. Master Brian

    Master Brian DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    368
    Location:
    Kansas

    The reason for the san tee in the tub side is so the tub has a vent. Otherwise it would vent through the AAV, the 4" vent is there, figured might as well use it!

    As for the san tee on it's back, what is preferred? A "Y"? Can I ask what is wrong with the san tee on it's back?

    I'm no expert, but like to learn. I basically put back what was there in cast, with the exception of few things that Y'd together before entering the main line. Now everything dumps into the main drain independentally. Before, I had the tub and the upstairs double vanity dumping into the main stack after meeting at a 2" Y, which Y'd into another Y at the main line, which leaked.
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