Drywall Question

Discussion in 'Remodel Forum & Blog' started by PM5K, Mar 21, 2010.

  1. PM5K

    PM5K New Member

    Messages:
    154
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    I have drywall which was originally supposed to have a texture sprayed on it, the homeowner changed their mind and now I have a wall that has been painted, however the drywall was never finished smooth. In other words I have lines and what not from where the drywall wasn't sanded because they thought they were going to spray texture over it so it wasn't necessary.

    How do I go about fixing this so I can have a smooth wall?

    TIA!
  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,995
    Location:
    New England
    It's very tedius to smooth it out over paint, breaking through with sandpaper is much harder than the 'raw' stuff, but it can be done. Whomever painted it before it was prepped properly should pay for it, IMHO.
  3. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,615
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    quote; Whomever painted it before it was prepped properly should pay for it, IMHO.

    If they were told to prepare it for texture, which is implied in the original question, and priced their installation based on that, then someone decided NOT to texture the wall, why would it be their responsibility? Now, unless the customer painted it themselves, or told the painter to paint it regardless, someone should have at least questioned the surface that was being painted. But even then if they were told to do it, as is,then they would not have any responsibility for additional preparations.
  4. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    I don't know if you can make tape seams disappear completely.....but if they are that obvious, then it was a second rate job done in anticipation of texture. That is why texture was invented...to reduce the drywall labor. I think if you want a smooth wall, you have to skim coat the entire wall. I think you can have that done over paint.
  5. PM5K

    PM5K New Member

    Messages:
    154
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    Well it's not really about who should pay for it as this happened a long, long time ago. It's really more about how it can be fixed now.
  6. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,995
    Location:
    New England
    Some of the high end jobs use blue-board which is deisgned to have a thin plaster applied over the whole surface. As noted, I don't know if you could do that over a painted surface, it may not adhere well. But, if it can, this can give you a fantastic, nice, flat wall. Otherwise, it may be easier to just put up say 1/4" drywall over what you have, and start over. Easier than tearing what you have out.
  7. PM5K

    PM5K New Member

    Messages:
    154
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    That seems far from ideal. I'd imagine I couldn't go over the paint (I believe it's a semi gloss) with a rolled on texture either could I? What options do I have realistically here if I either want a smooth finish, or I'm also willing to roll on a texture?
  8. drick

    drick In the Trades

    Messages:
    392
    I'm not an expert when it comes to plaster but I would probably use some fine grade sandpaper to rough the paint and the areas I was going to repair and plaster right over it. Ideally you would want to plaster a wall with no paint on it, but given that it is a little late for that option I think this is your best alternative if you want a smooth wall.

    -rick
  9. NCRC

    NCRC New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Escondido, Ca.
    Start with 150 grit sand paper or drywall type ( it looks like window screen). Sand ridges and high spots best you can. If paint is several months or more in age this task will be easier.
    Then hit high spots with 220 grit.
    Wall is now ready for a topping coat to smooth out high and low spots. Use a 8 to 12 inch blade. Minimal material needed. Keep it smooth and let it dry. Once dry sand and your ready for paint or spray texture.
    I'm guessing your not doing a skip trowel look.
    Best regards, NCRC
  10. PM5K

    PM5K New Member

    Messages:
    154
    Location:
    San Antonio, TX
    That's basically what my brother told me to do (He said sand it but wasn't specific about what grits to use). However since he doesn't do this for a living I was looking for a second opinion.

    Thanks.
  11. Anona Jean

    Anona Jean Guest

    wipe the wall with a damp rag to get most of the left behind dust use just one good prime coat without sanding this will work just fine with no worries. it is always good to have a sanding pole with swivel head even if you don't use it every day. it comes in handy when you need to sand a wall or ceiling. make sure the edges of the joint compound is feathered sos thast you don't get any noticing separation lines as the compound tapers down to the wall.
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