Draining first floor stand pipe into basement standpipe

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by cabinguy, Aug 30, 2009.

  1. cabinguy

    cabinguy New Member

    Messages:
    8
    Hello;
    I am planning to move a washer to the first floor. I plan to run the water lines and stand pipe up to a washing machine outlet box. It must be wrong because it seems too easy, but would like to see responses to the idea of running the standpipe into the basement and allowing it to drain directly into the laundry tub. This is my first post so am sorry if the question is really dumb.
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2009
  2. cabinguy

    cabinguy New Member

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    8
    Sorry; The title of the thread should have been Draining first floor stand pipe into basement LAUNDRY TUB
  3. FloridaOrange

    FloridaOrange Plumbing Designer

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    Are you asking if you can drain your washing machine into the tub?
  4. cabinguy

    cabinguy New Member

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    The washer will be on the first floor and the stationary tub is located in the basement one floor below the washing machine. Was planning to use a stand pipe but drain the stand pipe into the stationary tub instead of tying the stand pipe into an existing galvanized 2 inch drain line in the basement.
  5. cabinguy

    cabinguy New Member

    Messages:
    8
    The washer will be on the first floor and the stationary tub is located in the basement one floor below the washing machine. Was planning to use a stand pipe but drain the stand pipe into the stationary tub instead of tying the stand pipe into an existing galvanized 2 inch drain line in the basement.
  6. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

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    drain

    You would not need a "P" trap, but might need "splash guards" when the water comes rushing out of the pipe into the sink. Theoretically, the water could splash up as high as its source, but in reality it will be a lot less, but still substantial.
  7. cabinguy

    cabinguy New Member

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    Thanks HJ
    I can deal with the splashing, a plywood lid if nothing else. Just wanted to be sureit wasn't a code violation.
  8. Ian Gills

    Ian Gills Senior Robin Hood Guy

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    The two things I love most about code are:

    1) you can always drain your washer into a laundry tub; and

    2) your bathroom does not need an extractor fan if it has a window you can open.

    These two things always save us owners of older houses.

    But I still would not so what you propose on doing. It would look too "unconventional".
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2009
  9. cabinguy

    cabinguy New Member

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    Thanks;
    Will try your suggestion before employing the plywood lid. Appreciate all the useful input.
  10. seaofnames

    seaofnames DIY Senior Member

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    What condition is your galvinized drain pipe in?
  11. cabinguy

    cabinguy New Member

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    drain pipe looks good for being installed in the 50's. If I did tie in I would be less than three feet from where the 2" enters the 4" soil stack so venting wold not be an issue? I assume I could cut the galv. and insert a 2"pvc wye I would need to insert a p-trap that would be located in the basement but less than 42" below the top of the stand pipe. Is it wrong the "hide" a p-trap in a finished wall?

    If I drain the 2" pvc into the stationary tub instead of the galv drain I shouldn't need the p-trap should I?
  12. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

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    No standpipe receptor for any clotheswasher shall extend more then 30" inches nor less then 18" inches above it's trap.

    No trap for any clotheswasher standpipe receptor shall be installed below the floor, but shall be roughed in not less then six inches and not more than eighteen inches above the floor.

    UPC
  13. nhmaster

    nhmaster Master Plumber

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    It took me a while but if I get this correctly, you want to run a pipe on the first floor, down through the floor and then dump that pipe into the utility sink in the basement yes?

    If so, then number one, you can't trap it because that would be a double trap with the one on the utility sink, but it's a moot point because you would have a stand pipe far exceeding the maximum allowable length of 30" so the answer is no, it's not that easy.
  14. Ian Gills

    Ian Gills Senior Robin Hood Guy

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    Thank God for that.
    [​IMG]
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2009
  15. cabinguy

    cabinguy New Member

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    I am still trying to decide whether to connect the stand pipe directly into the drain line or to just dump it into the stationary tub. I understand now that if I drain into the drain line I need a trap between 18 and 30 inches below the top of the stand pipe which puts it inside the finished wall on the first floor.

    On the other hand I still don't know if draining into the stationary tub is "ok". I guess I don't see the difference between the stationary tub being filled from a washer in the basement or from a washer one floor up, with the exception of the splashing. The trap below the stationary tub doesn't know the difference does it?
  16. FloridaOrange

    FloridaOrange Plumbing Designer

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    Draining a washing machine into a laundry tub is a perfectly accepted means of connection.



    Usually they're on the same floor though. ;)
  17. nhmaster

    nhmaster Master Plumber

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    It HAS to be on the same floor! Distances from trap to fixture, trap to vent, you know, all that nasty code stuff, pretty much make it impossible to drain a washer into a sink on a different floor. At least, and do it to code.
  18. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

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    drain

    The code does not apply to a washer draining into a trapped fixture. A trap on the washer drain is not needed, but NOT because it would be a double trap, (which it would not be anyway). Having TWO traps is not the same as having a double trap. It would have no function because it is not connected to the sanitary system AND it would siphon every time you used the washer, so even if you did need it, it would be ineffective.
  19. Ian Gills

    Ian Gills Senior Robin Hood Guy

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    Listen. Everything else aside and regardless of whether it is technically to code or not...

    If you were to sell a house with a piece of PVC pipe dropping through the floor above to the basement below that dumps washer discharge into a utility sink, any housing inspector worth his salt would call that out as "unusual" and "refer it to a plumber".

    Why bother doing something so strange? Plumb it properly or keep the washer next to the utility sink.

    The whole point of DIY is to make it look like a professional (even a bad one) did it. If that cannot be achieved, don't bother.
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2009
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