Drain/venting questions on new bath design

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by shopkepr, May 15, 2007.

  1. shopkepr

    shopkepr New Member

    Messages:
    3
    I am in the process of working on plans on moving a wall in my bathroom to make my main bath a little bigger and making the master bath into a laundry room. (A new master suite will be built soon). I have attached an image of what I believe the plumbing drain/vent should look like. I have a feeling that the run for the washing machine is too long and I should vent it out the ceiling of the room and tie it back into the vent going out the roof. Any help/comments/suggestions appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Matt

    I have attached the image but if it does not work, here is a link to a copy of my layout. http://beveragemall.com/drain_vent.jpg

    Attached Files:

  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,003
    Location:
    New England
    I'll leave the specifics to the pros, but each of the traps should be vented individually. This doesn't mean numerous holes in the roof, but there should be a vent for each. You can combine them either in the walls, nominally 6" above the flood plane of the highest (often 42" is used), or take them all the way to the attic, then combine them. The distance between the fixture and the vent depends on the size of the drain line, but no drain should pass another without venting in between.
  3. shopkepr

    shopkepr New Member

    Messages:
    3
    My current toilet (2), sinks(2) and tubs (2) are all currently all tied into the Old vent/drain and are all within about 2 feet of the drain/vent. Can I not do that with them getting more that 2 feet away?

    Thanks,
    Matt
  4. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,631
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    vents

    The distance from a vent is important, but even more critical is where it is connected to the system. The sinks and laundry drains are NOT vented the way you have them drawn, regardless of how close they are to vents.
  5. matt, you are right about the Washing machine needing a vent, as described in your first post.

    The second big question is one that you may or may not get a lot of responses on. Whether you will get any comments from plumbers on how many vents in total.

    The way your plumbing was arranged before worked fine, was considered acceptable when it was built, and you certainly can rebuild in similar fashion; but whether or not anyone will want to say openly "yes you are right," is not a call i would want to make now. I wouldn't put money on it. So, it may be best not to ask that particular question worded that way.

    Is the sink now farther from the vent than earlier? It seems to me that 7.5' is real far. Do you know what an AAV is?

    So, to confirm what you asked in your first post, yes you need a vent at the washer.

    David
  6. shopkepr

    shopkepr New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Thanks for the reply. The sink is currently only 18 inches away from the vent/drain so it sounds like I would need to vent it.

    I can understand no one would want to comment yes or no about the rest. I am planning on submitting my plans to the county I live in and am trying to make only one trip the the county office for my permit.

    Thanks again,
    Matt
  7. shacko

    shacko Master Plumber-Gas Fitter

    Messages:
    561
    Location:
    Rosedale, Md
    New hook-up on plumbing

    I was hoping that someone else would comment, but I have to be the a-hole.
    There is no way that your proposed lay-out should pass any code that I know about; it would not have worked when the house was built, sorry.
  8. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,003
    Location:
    New England
    You can't run one drain line past another without individually venting them, regardless of how far they are from the main stack. This is called wet venting, and generally is not allowed as I understand it. It used to be, and depending on the size of the pipes, could work, but it could cause problems, too which is why it is no longer allowed. The goal is something that will always work (unless you clog it up).
  9. FloridaOrange

    FloridaOrange Plumbing Designer

    Messages:
    1,317
    Location:
    SW Florida
    Maybe in your neck of the woods. Wet venting is allowed and proper in Florida. Florida Plumbing Code Section 909. Our sanitary runs shallow so individually venting fixtures can be difficult and more expensive than it needs to be. There is a specific order, you don't run a shower off of the same line to a water closet because the water closet will syphon the shower trap dry, just for example. Works great and in the 20+ years I've been down here and the 7 years I've been doing plumbing design I haven't run across a problem...if it's properly designed and installed.
    Last edited: May 16, 2007
  10. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,631
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    wet venting

    If wet venting were not allowed, at least half the plumbers in this area would go out of business because that is the only way they know how to install plumbing.
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