Don't use extension cord for freezer?

Discussion in 'Electrical Forum discussion & Blog' started by SD44, Apr 18, 2008.

  1. SD44

    SD44 New Member

    Messages:
    40
    Location:
    Mississippi
    We bought a new upright freezer. With where we're wanting to put it, we need to use an extension cord. The maintenance man who works at my wife's workplace told her that using an extension cord for our freezer would mess up the motor.:confused:

    That makes no sense to me, is there anything to that?
  2. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    The point is this: the freezer is a large current draw when the compressor starts and runs. The typical cord you might use is too small gauge. It would cause voltage drop....bad for the motor; and might get hot....bad for your insurance policy. If you must use an extension cord, get the shortest one you can find, and I would get perferably a 12 guage cord. Absolute minimum acceptable would be 14 guage. DO NOT use a 16 or 18 guage cord.
  3. SD44

    SD44 New Member

    Messages:
    40
    Location:
    Mississippi
    Ahh, thanks. So basically I need to just use a good grade of cord. And I do understand what the gauges are. Thanks!
  4. Cookie

    Cookie .

    Messages:
    5,658
    Location:
    .
    Maybe it would be better to find a new place to put it rather than take a risk. I found out you can't have everything you want in life, sometimes, just as good as it gets; but, it sure beats the heck out of a fire. I wouldn't run a freezer on an extension cord. Period. One never knows.
  5. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,313
    Location:
    New England
    Wire gauge is analogous to the diameter of the wire used - this relates to how easily electricity can flow through the wires. Compare a soda straw verses a fire hose.

    Keep in mind that each time you make a connection, it could decrease the ability for the elecricity to flow, so adding a couple of new connections might diminish the ability of the cord to pass electricity unrestricted. So, it is important to use both good quality, and a cord with a large enough conductor. You are trying to prevent the restriction of flow of electricity and eliminate possible interruptions (as might be caused by a poorly designed or sized plug).
  6. Squ1rrel

    Squ1rrel New Member

    Messages:
    69
    Location:
    Texas
    Also, Bear in mind it may void your warranty. Alot of appliance manufacturers refuse to cover any appliance that is not plugged directly into the socket. Make sure to check the manual or contact the manufacturer on that issue.
  7. Chris75

    Chris75 Electrician

    Messages:
    608
    Location:
    Litchfield, CT
    The biggest problem is that the extension cord will eventually break down, and could possible start a fire, I would much rather see you install a new receptacle near the freezer than run a cord.
  8. Cookie

    Cookie .

    Messages:
    5,658
    Location:
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    Chris,

    That is the perfect solution! It is so much safer. Amazing, I would not had thought of it, lol. I would had been moving that freezer around, until it hit the curb. :D I vote on this one, new outlet, you must be a genius, :)
  9. Chris75

    Chris75 Electrician

    Messages:
    608
    Location:
    Litchfield, CT

    Nope, just an electrician... ;)
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