Deep Well Jet Cleaning or Replacement

Discussion in 'Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog' started by HELP!!!, Oct 7, 2004.

  1. HELP!!!

    HELP!!! New Member

    Messages:
    1
    I cannot build pressure over 30 lbs.. And after having the pump tested and exhausted all other possibilities--I've been told that it is a problem with the jet. My lines are poly piping, and after pulling 20 feet it seems to get stuck. My question is this--Is there a trick to pulling this? or is it possible to clean this using air pressure? Any help would be greatly appreciated as wife and kids are getting cranky.

    HELP!!!
  2. jjhhbk6

    jjhhbk6 New Member

    Messages:
    2
    deep well cleaning

    Hi did you get any help with this?? We are having same problem & don't know how to clean jets. Were you able to do it? JJHHBK6
  3. Pumpman

    Pumpman Pump Sales

    Messages:
    191
    Location:
    So. Cal
    The jet (nozzle) on a deep well jet pump is inside the deep well ejector, which is down in the well.
    The nozzle has a about a 3/16 hole in it, which clogs up quite easily.
    I doubt you'll get it unclogged without puilling the ejector all the way out of the well.
    It sounds like the ejector is probably hanging up on something in the well, if you can't pull it straight up.
    Might be time to get a well/pump person in to do the job. You don't want to break the ejector off down in the well.
    Ron
  4. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    Has anyone ever tried to clean a deep well ejector by getting a source of water or air and reversing the flow in the up-pipe of a deep well installation?

    The engineer in me would consider connecting an air compressor to the up pipe, fill the compressor to the shutooff pressure of the compressor (at least 100 psi), and open a ball valve to put the air into the up pipe.

    Use a compressor with the largest tank you can get.

    The air pressure would drive the water standing in the pipe backwards. If there is a check valve on the inlet (probably is and should be) then all of the flow will go through the jet and back up the down-pipe.

    It could work because it would produce a very high flow, higher than you could get with a pump, but for only a very short time. The process could be repeated because after a minute or so the water in the pipe will return to the static level in the well.

    Maybe some well pros could improve on the process.
  5. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    Most pump guys would not go to the expense of a large enough compressor to then drag around behind their truck/van so as to get enough cfm to blow out a jet blockage of possibly 150' deep by blowing enough air down the 1.25" line, through the jet and back up a 1" line to get a blockage out of the jet and have any reliability it wouldn't be back as soon as they reconnected the pitless etc. and turned on the pump.

    Or would they want to take on the liability of blowing up the drop pipe attempting to get the blockage out of the jet.

    And how would you know if you didn't just blow a small hole in the blockage as opposed to getting it all out of the jet?

    Also, most drop pipe has an accumulation of rust in them. That probably would be dislodged into the jet while attempting to unblock it.

    This is like many other things, if it would work, well drillers and pump guys would have figured thought of it and be doing it already. Kinda like the smart ones that go with a CSV instead of out there reinventing the wheel....
  6. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
    4,540
    Location:
    Riverview, Fl.
    I did it once. I was very young and the well was in a place where it couldn't be accessed by the pump hoist. I said I was young, not stupid. I didn't try to pull the jet by hand. I used the almost waterlogged 82 gallon tank as my water source and my little compresser that I carried around for blowing out galvanized tanks. After about an hour of plumbing to get the tank hooked to the casing adaptor in a reverse flow direction I pumped the tank up to 60 psi (that's all the compressor would do) and opened a ball valve to let the water fly all over the guys basement. It actually worked and he was back in water. I don't know how long it lasted as I never heard back from him again. Maybe the water in the basement bothered his wife, who knows? Hey, they had water again!

    I won't try it again, it's not worth it. I should have told him he needed a new well because it's going to happen again since he's using the same pump, casing adaptor and droppipe. Like Gary said, it's all scaled up and it's just a matter of time before it plugs again.

    bob...
  7. Raucina

    Raucina Previous member

    Messages:
    515
    So Gary, it looks like Bob was right. It will or can work, it HAS been done and based on no call back for speedbump, it works in one out of one case: wow, 100% success! Also, it seems only a small compresor will do the job. Looks like this remedy could be put into the poor homeowner fix it book before calling the pro with a visa card in hand.
  8. sammyhydro11

    sammyhydro11 Previous member

    Messages:
    709
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Raucina,
    forget the 100 percent success rate because its a shot in the dark. I have only done it as a last resort and have had very little success. If you want to waste someones time give him advice on the compressor fix.

    SAM
  9. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
    4,540
    Location:
    Riverview, Fl.
    Good advice Sammy.
  10. Raucina

    Raucina Previous member

    Messages:
    515
    My advice woud be to put in a real well and drop a submersible in it. At the depths you out easterners are discussing, any joe with a backhoe could dig your well and then you could drop in a 18" diameter screen and make some real water. If done with a gravel pack around the outside, this should last several generations. I just do not get fooling around with these screens and hammers.
  11. sammyhydro11

    sammyhydro11 Previous member

    Messages:
    709
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    If you had any real knowledge about well installations i dont think you would type the crap you do. You wonder why people here get so frustrated with people like yourself. All your unwise advice just leads to complete confusion.That whole back hoe and 18" diameter screen is so ridiculous and outrageously unpractical.Wells are not professionally installed with backhoes they are drilled. It takes more brains than your average joe to install these wells correctly. There is only one area that i know of in my state where anyone with a back hoe and some pipe could install a productive well. Even then he would need professional advice. People have these 2" wells installed because they work and are cheaper to put in than a 4" well with a submersible pump. I have seen these types of well work flawlessly for over 30 years. Get a grip and get some real experience before making comments about water wells.

    SAM
  12. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    I watched a man bore a well with a horse rig (early 1950s) in Michigan near the St Clair river. He had a large collapsible auger, a large tripod to lift it, and a horse walking around in a circle to bore the hole. He added 18" vitrified tiles as he went down, using riveted steel straps fabricated on site to keep the tiles aligned. I wasn't around to see him finish it so don't know those details.
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