cracked flange on concrete

Discussion in 'Toilet Forum discussions' started by ttuan, Jun 29, 2014.

  1. ttuan

    ttuan New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    VA
    I live in a condo high rise with concrete floors and about 3 days ago the toilet started to wobble when sat on. I looked more closely after flushing and the toilet was sealed all around with caulk, but the caulking was a little damp in one small spot. I've been looking for an excuse to replace the toilet since it clogs all the time and splashes way too much when flushed and thought this would be a good DIY experience because friends and the internet have told me its not too difficult. I thought it might be something wrong with the wax seal or the flange itself.

    First, I've removed the toilet and cleaned off most of the wax around the flange which is plastic. I see at least two cracks (each near the outside of the bolts) and I read online you can buy reinforcement rings that go on top of the existing flange and get drilled and screwed into the floor. However, the existing flange is not completely flat - the sides of the flange with the bolts are raised slightly, maybe around 1/4 inch or just slightly more, and the top and bottom sides of the flange are flat. Is that because of the wax that is underneath the flange, pushing it up? I'm not sure what to do at this point to make the flange flat.

    Also, since the floor is concrete, will I run into any issues with the reinforcement rings? I assume I can just get drill bits made for concrete drilling and use a regular sears drill for a small project like this.

    Thanks in advance for any help provided. Thankfully there are public restrooms in my building so I haven't needed to use my bathroom.
  2. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,415
    Location:
    IL
    Tapcons are blue screws that work nicely into concrete. The package identifies the correct drill size for drilling into concrete, and they generally sell that drill bit along side of the Tapcon screws.

    I think you are saying that there is a gap between the existing flange and the floor, but the flange is pretty much level. How high above the floor are the top and bottom of the flange?

    Or are you saying that the bulk of the flange is flush with the floor, but the damaged area is raised up. If that, you can probably press the damaged part back flush, or even cut it away if that is a small part of the flange.
  3. ttuan

    ttuan New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    VA
    The second point - bulk of flange is flush to floor but damaged area is raised up. I haven't been able to push down on it to flatten at all, which is why I was worried if I put in a ring the ring will not be flat either.
  4. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,124
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    When you say high rise and concrete, my first question is:

    Is this a wood framed building with light weight concrete poured 1.5" thick over plywood?
    Of is this a true concrete building with concrete floors?

    Trying to do much drilling with light weight and cause it to break up. You may do better on that with screws through the wood floor.
    If it's prestressed concrete, you can drill into that, being careful not to nick a cable.

    I would set any bowl down over the flange first to see if it rocks or not. If the flange is high, a horn may prevent the bowl dropping down to the floor.
    If it's low, you may need either thick wax, or two rings.
    Normally, if a flange is below finished floor, it tanks two.

    If the plastic flange is cracked and weak, you can secure it better with a flat repair flange.

    The lower part of a bowl has space under it, so a little above the floor is fine, and wax conforms.
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2014
  5. Reach4

    Reach4 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,415
    Location:
    IL
    You could sand off the high portion with a disk or belt sander, or you could cut away the portion that is bent up.
  6. ttuan

    ttuan New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    VA
    Thanks for the responses. I haven't been able to take out any of the old screws in the flange, so I wouldn't be able to use those screw holes for the repair ring. I bought a stainless steel one that has 6 holes, some of which line up with the existing flange holes - do I need to screw in all 6 holes or can I get away with less?
  7. Wallijonn

    Wallijonn Member

    Messages:
    147
    Location:
    Arizona
    Concrete floor with black PVC pipe? You'd remove the old flange gingerly, taking care not to damage the PVC pipe, and then install a Clam flange ring underneath the PVC pipe lip. But if it's cast pipe, you may have a easy or hard repair choice to make.
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