Cracked cast iron 4-way Tee in Vent stack/sewer drain in bathroom

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by Rudy6897, Apr 17, 2011.

  1. Rudy6897

    Rudy6897 New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Florida
    Quick summary: we’ve had a leak behind the bathroom wall from where the kitchen drain ties into the bathroom plumbing to reach the sewer drain pipe.

    From the picture I’m attaching, you’ll see the galvanized pipe coming from the left wall; I have successfully removed that pipe.



    The big issue is that when I was trying to remove the galv pipe coming in from the right side, the cast iron 4-Way Tee cracked off as I was just beginning to get the pipe to start to unscrew.

    It appears I will now have to cut out the 4-Way and replace.

    Do you have any advise or tips on how I should proceed?



    Thanks so much!

    Attached Files:

  2. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    14,770
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    You could cut the pipe below the fitting and use a no-hub coupling.
    Measure the OD of the pipe.
    If it's 4-3/8" it's a standard 4" no-hub
    If it's 4-1/8", then that's copper pipe size, and you will need a Copper x Cast no-hub, Mission makes those.

    [​IMG]

    A standard no-hub coupling with old cast iron pipe. This should have been a copper sized mission coupling by new cast iron.
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2011
  3. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,809
    Location:
    New England
    Before you cut anything, ensure that the upper and lower sections are properly supported, or you could have some big surprises (the upper is much more important than the lower, but it doesn't hurt to ensure it's supported as well). Depending on where you live, you may need to replace with CI. there are hubless equivalent pieces. All of the plastic pieces readily available seem to have hubs, which would require gluing in a stub to then mate with the existing CI.
  4. Rudy6897

    Rudy6897 New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Florida
    Terry,
    You, by far, have the very best informational plumbing website out there! I've spent a few hours here searching "cracked cast iron vent stack".

    I actually have access to most of all parts needed; my dad & I own a couple of Ace Hardware stores down here in Florida. We also have a few great plumbing contractors with charge accounts here that are also good friends; one has a son that works for us. Scott Curry (Curry Plumbing), came out to my house, before I had opened up the walls, to help track down where a leak was coming from behind the walls.

    Then, I have a college kid whose dad is a union plumber up in New York that told me pretty much what you're telling me to do; cut the cast iron pipe about 12" above the top hub, then cut about where the 2"x6" is notched out, use Fernco couplings, and be done with it. I'm just concerned that we can get the new PVC-DWV 4-way Tee to line up so we don't have to reroute any pipes. What about cutting right below the bottom of the lower hub? That would give us a little more leeway.

    As you might imagine, this whole plumbing fiasco is gonna be a battle with my Nationwide Insurance!

    Thanks for what you provide with this great site!
    Sincerely,
    Bruce
  5. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    14,770
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    I was thinking of cutting below the lower hub.

    When your guy says Fernco, he doesn't mean the rubber ones?
    We use the stainless steel banded couplings to prevent pipe shift.
    Some plumbers aren't aware of the two different cast iron pipe sizes. The non-banded Fernco will make up the difference in O.D, but they also don't hold the pipes in place, nor to they prevent the pipes from shifting. The shielded couplings do.

    [​IMG]
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2011
  6. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,258
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    The cross, (not a 4 way tee, which is something entirely different), will have letters cast into the side of it. Part of them will either be "XH", or "SV", which will tell you which material you have. In Florida, it is probably SV, in a "unionized" area it would usually be XH.
  7. Rudy6897

    Rudy6897 New Member

    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    Florida
    Calling in the troops!

    I think I'm calling in the troops, in other words, my loyal plumber, to correct the problem. He'll have all the proper tools, insurance, etc.,,,.

    I have my business to run (my dad & I own a couple of ACE Hardware stores), and Scott has a plumbing business to make a living with! Sure, I could probably get the project done in double the amount of time, but I have business to take care of here @ the store.

    Here's a better picture of the cracked pipe.
    Tee.jpg

    I think it's the right thing to do.
    My good friend, who's in his 70's, doesn't need to be getting beat up with this project; he'll be way more useful when it comes time to put all the walls back up and install the new bathroom components!
Similar Threads: Cracked cast
Forum Title Date
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & I got lead and it cracked a bit. Jun 25, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & uneven slab, cracked closet flange May 6, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & Cracked gas regulator on new stove? Feb 27, 2013
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ABS Sanitary Tee cracked Feb 16, 2013
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & PVC cracked while removing basement toilet flange Feb 27, 2012

Share This Page