cpvc vs aquapex

Discussion in 'Remodel Forum & Blog' started by sarasota fl, Sep 13, 2005.

  1. sarasota fl

    sarasota fl New Member

    Messages:
    2
    As a preventive measure, we wish to replumb our copper piping, slab foundation, one-story home in central FL. This house is 14 years old. We have not had any problems except for flooding from faulty hot water heaters. This house is intended to be passed to a 3rd generation (presently occupied by 1st generation), so we are looking for the best, longterm solution. We have been given conflicting, diverse opinions from the local plumbers. We cannot ascertain which might be the better option, aquapex or cpvc? The majority of the new plumbing will be in the attic which can easily reach 150+ degrees for 6 months a year. Some of the new plumbing might have to be on the outside of the house, however, we will frame and stucco over those areas for concealment for protection and aesthetics. We will not be doing any of this work ourselves, only professionals will be hired.
  2. Kristi

    Kristi Tradesman Plumber

    Messages:
    176
    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    The most tried and true material of all? Copper... if you're concerned about longevity for the sake of future generations, copper has the history to back up its performance. On a side note: 14 years is not old for a home, do you really feel it's necessary to overhaul the entire home at this point? There shouldn't really be preventative measures to take with the system or structure unless it was cheaply/shoddily built in the first place, and it sounds like there aren't any problems with the place that need to be tended to (except the water heater). Homes and their systems are built to last a lot longer than 14 years, and it should be good to go for a looooong time... not all of them, mind you! But most of them...
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2005
  3. finnegan

    finnegan New Member

    Messages:
    250
    Location:
    CT
    I agree, 14 years is not old at all. I would not change a thing unless you are aware of problems that you did not mention. In any event, copper is still the standard in the Northeast, but you are seeing pex more often now. CPVC is not widely used, but it works. Pex is a great choice when freezing is a concern. Running pipes in outside walls will ordinarily cause such a concern around here, but perhaps in Florida that is not much of a concern. CPVC pipe is flexible enough to withstand freezing fairly well, but its fittings do not fair so well. Pex has no problems with freezing. (Water will of course freeze, but not often break the tubing.) Pex will not have any problems with the heat in your attic either.
  4. sarasota fl

    sarasota fl New Member

    Messages:
    2
    Generally speaking, yes, I agree about copper, since I am originally from the northeast. The house is in one of many subdivisions within a 10,000+ acre development in Sarasota, FL. The reason for the replumb is that thousands of homes that are only 2+ years age, collectively in all of the subdivisions, have experienced multiple pinhole leaks at an alarming rate. We are in the process of a general remodel when one of our 7 year old hot water heater's seam split overnight, only to awaken to 5 inches of flooding throughout 90% of the home. With the humidity factor here in central FL, mold takes hold very rapidly, hence the preventive measure that many homeowners are now taking in these subdivisions, not to mention general water damage. So with a general contractor and plumber already on the premise, we thought of NOT having to go through a water issue again. Our water supplier in Sarasota, as a result of all the pinhole leaks, has added an anti-corrosive agent at the water treatment plant since Jan.'05. Also, the southeast corner of the USA has a very high mineral content in the water. And, it is my understanding from many sources who have done in-depth research, that pinhole leaks with copper is becoming an ever increasing problem overall throughout the USA. Thanks for your input and any other info you can share.
  5. Cal

    Cal New Member

    Messages:
    228
    Location:
    Northern Virginia
    I use cpvc A LOT . One thing about it,,,,,,can't be out in the sun. So cover it up if you use it. Have not used pex.Heard many good things about it but can't get homeowner's in the No.Va. area to get over their poly b. scare. We got burned REAL BAD here by the polybutelyne (sp?) break/rupture problem a few years ago.

    You should call your local water authority and ask if any of the newer chemicals they are using adversly affects the make up of cpvc or pex. 'Course the first answer you are going to get is " Ah,,,,No dude" but keep pushing till you can talk with a real human who knows something.
  6. Last edited: Sep 14, 2005
  7. MPM made it easy for all of us who don't want to type it all out again. I have been told in Florida that there are certain parts that the water is so corrosive that it eats more than just copper pipes. I certainly wouldn't want to be showering in that let alone drinking it. Cal brought up a very interesting point about certain chemicals affecting CPVC piping. A point worth considering. CPVC made me $323 last week on that particular job. UV damage and joint blew out under the sink. Switched it back to copper like it was to begin with.
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2005

Share This Page