Cost to install icemaker

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice, Tips & ' started by price914, Apr 27, 2007.

  1. price914

    price914 New Member

    Messages:
    25
    We're looking to upgrade our frig. The one that will fit has an icemaker, which we don't currently have. We have a galley style kitchen - the sink is across from the frig. How much money are we looking at to install the icemaker line? I'm guessing it would be done in the crawl space? In Seattle, if that makes a difference.
  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,804
    Location:
    New England
    This is something you probably could do. You'd swap the cold-water shutoff under the sink for one with two outputs (much better than using a saddle valve!) and run soft copper 1/4" line. Many of the shutoffs are compression fit, so this is pretty much a matter of unscrewing the compression nut, sliding the valve off, then inserting the new one and retightening (the original) nut and compression ring. You can replace those if you want, but may need a puller to remove them first. The soft copper tubing is flexible. Where are your existing pipes run? If they run in the crawl space and you haven't had problems with them freezing, then you would probably be okay. I'd worry about that.

    Another option is to run it under the toekick. On new construction, they sometimes run it behind the cabinets, but you'd have to probably remove the counter on existing ones which probably isn't feasible. Depending on what is on the other side of the wall, you might be able to run the tubing there, maybe behind the moulding if you notch out the area.
  3. price914

    price914 New Member

    Messages:
    25
    Oy. Since most of what you just said was Greek to me, (and my husband is handy, but maybe not THAT handy!), I think it might be better to have a pro do it, which is why I was wondering about cost.

    As for the pipes freezing, we actually just bought this house, but since it was built in the 50's, I'm thinking the pipes must be OK in the crawl space (and honestly, I'm just assuming that's where the pipes are).
  4. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    14,763
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    In Seattle it's almost impossible to freeze pipes in the crawlspace.

    It's right near Puget Sound.
    But if Seattle gets about 1" of snow, just forget about it.
    No traffic moves.
    The snow is wet and slippery, and too many hills.
  5. Verdeboy

    Verdeboy In the Trades

    Messages:
    2,051
    Why not just call a plumber or a good handyman for a quote. The good handyman would probably do it for around a hundred. You can expect to double that for a licensed plumber.
  6. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,804
    Location:
    New England
    It is nearly impossible to judge the capabilities of people from afar. If you can run the tubing in the crawlspace, it really is pretty simple. I'd use soft copper tubing rather than plastic, though. It will cost a bit more but is more durable. Crawling under the house is the hardest part. Drill the holes from above first. Take the tubing underneath with you since poking a short piece up is easier than threading a bunch down. If you want the curves to look nice and reduce the risk of crimping the tubing when you bend it, buy a cheap spring tubing bender. It looks like a tightly wound spring. You slide it over the tubing and then bend it - it prevents the tubing from crimping unless you try to bend it into too tight of a curve. Leave a big loop (maybe 4-5' in diameter behind the frig so you can pull it out without straining anything (like a big coil spring).
  7. price914

    price914 New Member

    Messages:
    25
    Thanks for the help! It's nice to know it's not a huge job - this is our first house so we're learning all kinds of things!
  8. markts30

    markts30 Commercial Plumber

    Messages:
    630
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    One warning...If you are using RO water from under the sink, use plastic tubing...
    RO water is hell on copper pipe...
  9. I've seen simplistic icemaker line installs and I've seen some threaded through joists and small spaces that looks like it would take 3 hours to do.

    I never flat rate that type of work. I'd get there and sure enough...it would be a difficult one.
  10. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,302
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    Just don't get conned into using a saddle connector. These are prone to fail. You need to come off of a cold water supply line somewhere, but it just depends on your house as to where. It's usually a pretty simply installation.
  11. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    "Leave a big loop (maybe 4-5' in diameter behind the frig so you can pull it out without straining anything (like a big coil spring)."

    I think that maybe 4-5' of length (or circumference) would do it.
  12. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,804
    Location:
    New England
    While most people don't pull their frig out very often, especially if it is in an alcove, without that loop, you risk crimping the tubing. If you have a big loop, there's no stress on anything when you pull it out.
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