Correct wiring of GFCI Breaker

Discussion in 'Electrical Forum discussion & Blog' started by Giles, Feb 19, 2010.

  1. Giles

    Giles Retired tool & Die and Mechanic

    Messages:
    110
    Location:
    N.W. Alabama--Florence--
    Some time ago, a friend gave me some circuit breakers. One in question is a SIEMONS QPF 120.
    On the side of the breaker, the attached ground wire is marked "Panel Neutral". Then just above this , is a terminal marked "Load Neutral". The other terminal is not marked but has white paint above it.
    The breaker still had short wires attached and the hot was connected to the white marked terminal.
    I think the neutral should be hooked to the white marked terminal as this is how I have done it before.
    How should this be hooked up?
  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,817
    Location:
    New England
    There are three bus bars in the panel (well, you could say 4, but I'm considering power as only one): power, neutral, and ground. Neutral and ground are bonded together in the main panel. The cable to the load would run its ground to the normal ground bus. Its neutral needs to go to the load terminal on the GFCI breaker. Then, you need a jumper lead to go from the GFCI line neutral to the neutral bus bar. The GFCI needs a connection to both the line's hot and neutral. Then load hot would go to the load connection on the GFCI.
  3. Giles

    Giles Retired tool & Die and Mechanic

    Messages:
    110
    Location:
    N.W. Alabama--Florence--
    THANKS---Load connection is not marked. The WHITE marking on the other terminal is where I am confused. Do some GFCI have line connected to a white marked terminal?
    I am sure there is something simple that my brain can't grasp.
  4. Jim Port

    Jim Port Electrical Contractor

    Messages:
    156
    Location:
    Maryland
    Just connect the white neutral to the terminal labeled "Load Neutral". That will only leave the other terminal for the load hot.
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2010
  5. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,817
    Location:
    New England
    The load hot (black) would normally go on the outside (end) terminal. The spec sheet is probably on the Siemens website.
  6. Giles

    Giles Retired tool & Die and Mechanic

    Messages:
    110
    Location:
    N.W. Alabama--Florence--
    There is only two terminals on the "end" and each is on the "outside".
    I have done an extensive search for a spec. sheet. I have found very little.
    I am sure the paperwork that came with the breaker, when new, gave instructions.
    Strange that I can't even find that.
  7. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    21,817
    Location:
    New England
    they both would need to be for the neutral and hot. The neutral from the GFCI to the neutral bar may be captive with the breaker itself. So, the incoming cable would have its neutral and hot connected to the breaker, and the ground to the ground bar. Then, the neutral from the breaker would go to the neutral bar.
  8. Alectrician

    Alectrician DIY Senior Member

    Messages:
    689
    Yes. Silver, slotted screw is the neutral.

    Brass screw = hot.

    White pigtail to neutral bus.
  9. Giles

    Giles Retired tool & Die and Mechanic

    Messages:
    110
    Location:
    N.W. Alabama--Florence--
    I installed the breaker and the terminal marked, with what appears to be factory applied white paint, is the HOT. The paint is what had me concerned.
    Why was the HOT terminal marked with white paint and it is basically the same color screw?
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