copper pipe in masonry wall

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by geothrm, Jan 26, 2009.

  1. geothrm

    geothrm New Member

    Messages:
    6
    My house is made of cinderblock and concrete. I need hot water in my utility room.

    I want to run 1/2 copper pipe from under my kitchen sink, thru the wall to the outside, along the outside wall to the back of the utility room, and thru the wall again. The outside run is about 18 feet long.

    A friend told me that I can use a circular saw with a masonry blade to cut a trench for the outside run. Then lay the pipe in the trench, and refill the trench.

    Does this sound feasible? What size saw do I need? Any special masonry blade? What should I use to refill the trench: concrete, mortar?

    So, I think I know how to do this, I just don't know the specifics. If I could get some assurance, before getting started, that I won't ruin my saw, or (worse) my house, that would be greatly appreciated.

    Geo.
  2. yes it will work

    I dont know what it will do to your saw blade. or how many
    saw blades you will chew up....maybe you ought to rent a saw..

    I know it would be wise to put the copper pipe in
    some sort of protective sleeve through the wall and
    in the trench .before you cover it up...

    the black armaflex covering works best..
  3. geothrm

    geothrm New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Thanks Mark. I guess this is not really a plumbing question, so I'll switch to a masonry forum. But thanks for the tip on insulation, which I wouldn't have thought of.

    Geo.
  4. frenchie

    frenchie Jack of all trades

    Always wrap copper in insulation (compressible foam type sleeves are typical) where it contacts masonry. The pipe needs some play for expansion & contraction without rubbing against the masonry.

    I'm going to assume you're somewhere warm enough for pipe freezing not to be an issue...
  5. geothrm

    geothrm New Member

    Messages:
    6
    Yes, actually in Puerto Rico. I'm guessing the temp swing is rarely any greater than 60-95. May be enough to cause damage over the years?
  6. frenchie

    frenchie Jack of all trades

    The pipes will still move from hot/cold water going through them, so you still need to sleeve them in something compressible.

    You might have a harder time finding the foam insulation sleeves I was talking about, down there, than up here, though!

    ... just wrap the pipe in something that will create some space around it when you re-pack the trench.
  7. geothrm

    geothrm New Member

    Messages:
    6
    OK, thanks frenchie.
  8. daz49

    daz49 New Member

    Messages:
    3
    you may want to find out what the chemicals in the concrete will do to the copper overtime
  9. geothrm

    geothrm New Member

    Messages:
    6
    It appears there are no chemical reactions between copper and concrete that would prevent this.
  10. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Messages:
    15,416
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    Copper and concrete are always a bad combination.

    Code here requires that the copper be protected from the concrete.
  11. geothrm

    geothrm New Member

    Messages:
    6
    And the insulation should take care of that.
  12. SewerRatz

    SewerRatz Illinois Licensed Plumber

    Messages:
    1,705
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
Similar Threads: copper pipe
Forum Title Date
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Copper Vertical Vent Pipe Question (Hopefully Simple, But Very Important) Dec 4, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Mixed Repipe - PEX for Hot Water and Copper for Cold Water? Nov 24, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Prepping a Slip Coupling for Copper Pipe Nov 22, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Planning Ahead to Service Your Copper Pipes Jul 25, 2014
Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice Flushing Copper Pipe Jul 22, 2014

Share This Page