? Connected Gas Dryer with Gas Boiler on same line-Now Pilot Light turns off ?

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by 87vertgt, Oct 14, 2011.

  1. 87vertgt

    87vertgt New Member

    Messages:
    52
    Location:
    Chicago,IL
    ? Connected Gas Dryer with Gas Boiler on same line-Now Pilot Light turns off ?

    Appears the dryer is sucking in too much gas?

    Should I feed it a smaller gas line like 3/8 instead of a 1/2 ?
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 16, 2011
  2. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,249
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    What you are suggesting is not possible, the dryer cannot "suck gas".

    If you have undersized any part of the piping system, it is possible that an appliance will not receive the volume of gas required for it to operate properly.
  3. Tom Sawyer

    Tom Sawyer In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,233
    Location:
    Maine
    If you use a smaller line to the dryer then the dryer will still operate but not at the maximum btu output for which it was designed and clothes that would have dried in a half hour will now take much longer and use more gas. You need to have someone that knows what they are doing, come in and size the gas line to the appliances properly.
  4. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Messages:
    7,360
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    Gas work should only be undertaken by a trained professional. You can screw up a drain line or a water supply and just have a puddle of water to deal with. Screw up with gas and the noise can ruin you whole day.
  5. cwhyu2

    cwhyu2 Consultant

    Messages:
    1,348
    Location:
    Cincinnati OH
    That is a fact!
  6. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    No. But if you have (or if someone else has) tapped into the line to the heater in order to get gas for the dryer, then that should not have been done since the line to the heater now appears to be large enough to supply only the heater.
  7. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,843
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    Reducing the size of the line to the dryer, if that is acutally the cause of the pilot outage, (which is highly unlikely, however), WILL not correct an "undersized pipe" condition but COULD keep the dryer from operating properly. HOWEVER if the line cannot feed the dryer AND a pilot light, then the line is so undersized that NEITHER the dryer NOR the boiler will burn properly, even it they were the ONLY appliance on that line.
  8. 87vertgt

    87vertgt New Member

    Messages:
    52
    Location:
    Chicago,IL
    thanks for the feedback I guess.....not really.....


    lotta pricks on here. on other forums i would get constructive advice. not "dont do that" "call a plumber"

    wtf? is this not a "DIY" forum as it states on the first page?

    Sounds like alot of yall have your big over confident head stuck in your ass.

    come back down to reality...your wear a blue collar, plumbing is not rocket science.

    i've managed alot of house's and made alot of money of them by doing my own work or having some grammer school drop out doing it for me.
  9. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    au contraire, kemosabe: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GF_Wrm-Ns0I

    You CAN make plumbing rocket science, or just a rocket!

    If you want bedside manor, check with Dr. Drew. If you want the "book" on why folks here were telling you that from your question your should possibly not be working on gas....get a copy of the National Fuel Gas Code book. Actually not an expensive book, and it will tell you about btu supply, pipe size, etc.
  10. bluebinky

    bluebinky Member

    Messages:
    406
    Location:
    Santa Clara, CA
    No one wants to give advice about gas here. Shouldn't be too hard to understand.
  11. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    Not in the usual sense. This forum began with Terry as a helpful professional, but it was never intended to be a "teaching forum" where "the pros" would show DIYers how to do everything ... and then over these more-recent years, a few people have come along and begun trying to make themselves feel important by doing some arrogant bullying. Terry is not at all like that and hj might seem a bit gruff or curt at times, but even he and the other real pros here, including ol' jimbo, both will and do give advice freely as long as they can first be fairly confident the recipient knows how to safely make good use of it.

    Aside from all of that, however, is the matter of often needing to know details prior to saying much at all. In your particular case, no information has been offered as far as the original plumbing to the heater before the dryer was added, and these guys are at least trying to say something useful even while not yet having anywhere near enough information to actually help solve the problem.
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2011
  12. cwhyu2

    cwhyu2 Consultant

    Messages:
    1,348
    Location:
    Cincinnati OH
    Thank you Lee, I try to give good advice but like you said the more imformation the better.
  13. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    You are welcome ... and while it took me a while to understand this, the long-timers here (as well as some newer folks, of course) really are some great guys! As I recall, one of my very first questions ever posed here was in relation to my desire to control the voltage being supplied to a cut piece of heating wire I had installed in a bathroom floor. The original piece of wire was intended for 208/240, but I had only installed about 1/3 of that piece and then discovered I could not safely feed it with 120V. After helping me understand about resistance and some related stuff such as even the code for maximum wattage per square foot, some of these guys explained a variety of ways I could use lights bulbs or whatever else in series in order to send 120V to the overall circuit and still have only about 70V actually at/in the heating wire. None of those "solutions" were truly practical, of course, but these guys have been some of my very-best teachers ever over these past several years ... and in that particular case, I ended up using a variable transformer for at least temporarily supplying that heating wire and proving them completely correct!
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2011
  14. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    Agreed. I grew up in an RV factory in the '60s where/when anybody who was breathing fairly well at the time could be a "plumber" (or even an "electrician"), and I have seen some serious shit happen when a fitting was not made properly or a connection was left loose or whatever ... and just a few years ago, even I had to call the gas company out to use their detector and locate a small leak I could only smell after a previous homeowner had done some of his own work.
  15. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,843
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    quote; wtf? is this not a "DIY" forum as it states on the first page?

    YES, when DIY is appropriate. In this case you have a problem, which MAY have been caused by YOUR diy installation, but it is NOT one we can advise you on without seeing the actual installation. As long as you are happy with your "grammar school dropout", keep on with your "handyman" repairs. As Home Depot says, "anyone can be a plumber, or anything else", as long as they buy their materials from them and use their advice.
  16. Tom Sawyer

    Tom Sawyer In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,233
    Location:
    Maine
    Did you not read my post? I gave you the explanation and the advice appropriate to someone that knows so little about gas piping that you already HAD made the mistake and now you are looking for someone to bail you out. Unlike rocket science, plumbing and gas fitting does require a license. Maybe you can find another forum where someone will hold your hand and give you step by step advice on what to do. Brilliant but how do you know that the guy giving the advice has any idea WTF he's doing? Call someone with a license before you blow your damn house off the foundation Mr. Handyman.

    come back down to reality...your wear a blue collar, plumbing is not rocket science. If I didn't think Terry would edit it out I'd tell you to take your blue collar and stuff it where the moon don't shine pal. Seems like us "blue collars" know something that your white collar education didn't teach you.
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2011
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