Complete bathroom remodel

Discussion in 'Shower & Bathtub Forum & Blog' started by Daveclink, Feb 26, 2012.

  1. Daveclink

    Daveclink New Member

    Messages:
    9
    Location:
    Syracuse, NY
    DSCN0562.jpg

    Hi Everyone

    I gutted my entire bathroom down to the studs and joists. I will replace the tub with a shower. I'm not sure the best way to handle the water pipes. In the picture you can see the water pipes on the outside of the studs, upward at an angle. I will have to move the pipes because of the shower floor. My first idea was to build a wall inside the existing wall for the plumbing, however, I will be adding another joist next to the butchered one. The drain would have to move and would end up where the new joist is located. My second thought was to build a half wall on the side and bring the pipes up. I'm open to any suggestions.

    Thank you

    Dave
  2. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,139
    Location:
    New England
    Is the wall where the water pipes come up an outside wall, or an interior one? If interior, I'd consider moving them to inside that wall, assuming that's where you want the shower valve. As to moving the drain, you essentially have two choices on a shower: a linear drain near one wall (most common situation), or a traditional drain preferably centered in the shower. If your drain is centered, it makes it neater since you can have similar slopes all around to the walls. WRT the drain, you may also want to move the vent into that wall. The joist at the bottom of that wall makes it a bit harder (you'd need access from the room on the other side, or from below), but probably the best way to do it. Hard to tell unless you're there. Some people like to have the shower valve close to the entrance, so you can turn it on and adjust the temp prior to getting in there - it doesn't have to be close to the showerhead - you can put it nearly anywhere you want.
  3. Daveclink

    Daveclink New Member

    Messages:
    9
    Location:
    Syracuse, NY
    Thanks very much for your input. A question about the vent. There is 1 vent in the bathroom. It is on the opposite corner of the bathroom from the shower, which is where the toilet is. the room is 9 X 10. Should I add another vent near the shower?
  4. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,139
    Location:
    New England
    While you may only have one vent out the roof, EACH fixture should have it's own connection into it. Now, there are some acceptable ways to 'wet vent' stuff, but the order of the fixtures and their type and exact location matters...yes, you should run a vent line up. It can connect say in the attic, or in the room's walls. There are rules about how far it can go before it turns up based on the pipe diameter. Generally, you can connect vents at least 42" above the floor, or at least 6" above the flood rim of the highest fixture (usually a sink). The reason for vents is not necessarily to drain, but to prevent the waste flowing by a different trap from being sucked dry. A dry vent creates an opening directly into the sewer for gasses, vermin, bugs, etc.
  5. Daveclink

    Daveclink New Member

    Messages:
    9
    Location:
    Syracuse, NY
    Thanks Jim
    I appreciate your help.
  6. Daveclink

    Daveclink New Member

    Messages:
    9
    Location:
    Syracuse, NY
    I'm leaning toward building a 3 ft wall (2 X 6) and running the water pipes in the wall. installing the shower valve on this wall so we can turn the shower on and not get wet. I would also run the vent pipe up this wall and vent it in the attic. This is not my first choice, but might be my best choice. I would rather place the vent on the wall where the shower head is located, but I don't think it will fit. Today I will tear out some drywall and see how much room I have. I was planning on buying the Kerdi shower kit. The shower floor would be off center model. After reading some of the experts' threads on the off center model I might change to the center drain. if I move the drain to the center will the vent be too far away if I place it on the wall where the shower head is located. That's all for now.

    Thanks

    Dave
  7. johnfrwhipple

    johnfrwhipple Bathroom Design & Build - North Vancouver, B.C.

    Messages:
    4,406
    Location:
    North Vancouver, BC
    Post(s) deleted by John Whipple
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2014
  8. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,249
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    I'm not sure if I understood correctly, but you can't vent into the attic. You can combine the vents in the attic so that only one pipe needs to go through the roof. The shower drain must be 2", but the vent can rise from the drain several feet downstream of the trap, making it easier to route the vent up into a wall.
  9. Daveclink

    Daveclink New Member

    Messages:
    9
    Location:
    Syracuse, NY
    Thanks for the advice. The construction of this bathroom, by the original owner, was all wrong. It's time to hire a plumber to make it right.

    Dave
  10. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,139
    Location:
    New England
    Hopefully it's obvious, but no, you can't actually vent in the attic, but it's fairly common to join separate vent lines there to limit the number of roof penetrations required. It's often easier to run it up, rather than around a room and join multiple ones in the walls.
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