Circuit Question

Discussion in 'Electrical Forum discussion & Blog' started by Al G., Oct 11, 2011.

  1. Al G.

    Al G. New Member

    Messages:
    20
    Location:
    Woodbridge, VA
    I'm adding some shoplights to my garage and am running EMT conduit from a new switch to the fixtures. Because of the switch and fixture locations, the most efficient plan is to run the conduit up the wall from the switch to a 4" box on the ceiling and then branch in 2 directions to the fixtures. Is this branch OK? Somewhere in the back of my mind I remember seeing something about not branching like this, that the run has to be continous from the switch to each fixture in a daisy chain. I could do the single run but it would mean more conduit and more wire.
    Thanks.
  2. jwelectric

    jwelectric Electrical Contractor/Instructor

    Messages:
    2,565
    Location:
    North Carolina
    Sounds like a plan to me
  3. Al G.

    Al G. New Member

    Messages:
    20
    Location:
    Woodbridge, VA
    The switch will control receptacles in the ceiling for plug-in shoplights. Do those receptacles need to be GFCI protected? The switch will be in a 2-gang box with a GFCI receptacle. If those in the ceiling need to be protected can I put the switch in the hot conductor coming off the load side of the GFCI?
  4. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    27,253
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    quote; seeing something about not branching like this, that the run has to be continous from the switch to each fixture in a daisy chain

    That would be VERY cumbersome in an installation where the switch was positioned at the center of the string of lights. At one time, as long as the lights were plugged into a "single device receptacle" so it could NOT be used for an extension cord, for example, it would not have to be GFCI protected.
  5. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,279
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    Everything in a garage should be GFCI protected.

    If it is wired properly, it does not matter how you go about it. You can use a GFCI breaker, one GFCI receptacle feeding the rest of the garage, or all GFCI receptacles.

    Also worth mentioning is that the EMT is an approved grounding conductor, and all metal boxes with devices must be pig-tailed to a proper machine threaded ground screw installed in the box.
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