Cast iron Connection Problem

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by pwelsh130, Jan 1, 2010.

  1. pwelsh130

    pwelsh130 New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2010
    Location:
    melbourne,fl
    I have a Cast Iron Vent Stack that the Kitchen sink assembly connects into. The problem is the horizontal drain pipe that connected into the sink was cracked next to the vent stack connection. I can not remove the threaded nut that attached the original horizontal pipe (took the broken pipe out but not the nut) to the vent stack. It is tucked into a concrete block wall and the pipe wrench can't get a grip. Any suggestions?

    I have tried penetrating compound....Attaching a pvc pipe with epoxy. I put a torch to it but no help. I'm out of options. I've attached some pics.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Gary Swart

    Gary Swart In the Trades

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2004
    Location:
    Yakima WA
    I appears to me that you have reach the point that you need professional help. We DIYers have to realize that there is a point where our individual skills, tools, and know-how stop and it is time to set our egos aside and call in the Cavalry.
     
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  4. Terry

    Terry Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2004
    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Bothell, Washington
    If it's a threaded connection, it should come out.

    It may take a lot of muscle though

    Sometimes warming the tee helps.
     
  5. RTAPlumbing

    RTAPlumbing Plumber

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2010
    Location:
    lawrenceville, GA
    Use a bigger pipe wrench. It will come out. Try applying heat from the inside with your torch. You can always cut it out and just get another sanitary tee. good luck
     
  6. dcelite

    dcelite Plumber

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2009
    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Los Gatos, CA
    It looks like a trap adaptor which used to be soldered in. You can use a sawzall or hack saw blade and cut out a section of the threaded piece from the inside. Put the saw blade inside the fitting and cut straight down through the threads until you hit the cast iron. Then move around about a half inch and make a similar cut. Then pry out the little piece you just cut and you'll be able to spin out the rest of the adaptor.
     
  7. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2004
    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    pipe

    It is a solder bushing for a tubular trap. Remove the vestiges of the trap by heating the solder and pulling the piece out. Then make two cuts, about 1/8" apart through the brass and remove the sliver between the cuts. Then use a chisel to fold the brass together to close up the slot, and it will unscrew, probably by hand.
     
  8. SewerRatz

    SewerRatz Illinois Licensed Plumber

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    Occupation:
    Chicago Illinois Licensed Plumber
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    I run into them solder bushings all the time I use a caping chisel to remove them with out damaging the tee or the threads.
     
  9. MACPLUMB 777

    MACPLUMB 777 TROJAN WORLDWIDE SALES RP

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  10. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2004
    Occupation:
    Plumber
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    wrench

    Then you haven't broken the outlet of the tee off yet?
     
  11. SewerRatz

    SewerRatz Illinois Licensed Plumber

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    Occupation:
    Chicago Illinois Licensed Plumber
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    Never with my cape chisel. I always have had good luck with it caving in the pipe or fitting I wanted to remove with out blowing out the tee.
     
  12. ilya

    ilya In the Trades

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2009
    Occupation:
    home repair -I am not licensed and never represent
    Location:
    Akron Ohio
    I'm not a longtime pro, but dcelites method has always worked for me. Make sure the two cuts are NOT a "pie wedge" or it'll never come out. I always try to do the opposite-my two cuts are closer together at the threads. Then knock it out w/ a chisel, and unscrew. Once or twice I've had to repeat the process on the opposite side of the fitting,cutting it in two. Then a tap w/ the chisel knocked each half loose.
     
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