Can overhead service wire be run inside conduit?

Discussion in 'Electrical Forum discussion & Blog' started by leejosepho, Jun 1, 2008.

  1. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    I need to run 50' of wire to carry at least 60 amps (220) to the subpanel in my attached workshop, and the cost of the wire is presently keeping that project on hold. I can get a used length of twisted, 100-amp (outdoor overhead) service wire from a friend for virtually nothing, and I am asking if there is any problem with running that wire through conduit from my basement to the new workshop. I would have to add a 4th strand for the ground, and all of that might fit inside 1" conduit.

    Is there anything saying that particular service wire should not be run inside conduit and through walls?

    Thank you!
  2. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

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    It's probably twisted and will be very hard to pull if there are any bends.

    You should untwist it, use a larger conduit (not more than 40% fill), and get some lubricant. You will also need to have some means to apply more tension than you can apply by yourself, and someone to push on the inlet end.

    Wire in conduit has a lower ampacity than is applied to overhead services applications.
  3. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

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    wire

    It is also probably aluminum with a bare neutral so you have to make provision for it when you connect it.
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2008
  4. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    Can I use four strands of the wire in this picture?

    Here is the auction description:

    #6 AWG STRANDED INSULATED GROUND COPPER WIRE 250' ROLL

    Wire reads: REPUBLIC WIRE 6 AWG TYPE MTW OR THHN OR THWN-2 600V OR GASOLINE AND OIL RES II (UL) OR AWM-VW-1 SUN RES OR C-(UL) TYPE T90 NYLON OR TWN 75 E167613 FT1

    Thank you!

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Oct 12, 2008
  5. Billy_Bob

    Billy_Bob In the Trades

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    FYI - As to the label on the package and it saying "Ground Wire", the Andrew company sells large satellite and microwave dishes which require grounding. Thus I think they are "repackaging" this wire and calling it ground wire.

    Here is their info on this...
    http://awapps.commscope.com/catalog/product_details.aspx?id=361
  6. jwelectric

    jwelectric Electrical Contractor/Instructor

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    No to both questions
  7. Chris75

    Chris75 Electrician

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    I agree with Mike, what your propose is a violation.
  8. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

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    garage

    As an aside, your garage will probably have a subpanel and that should be grounded with a ground rod, not necessarily a ground wire back to the original panel.
  9. Chris75

    Chris75 Electrician

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    ground rods are for lightning protection, not the ground your talking about. Oh, and attatched buildings with sub-panels do not require ground rods, but they do require 4 wires.
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2008
  10. Chris75

    Chris75 Electrician

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    Why dont you just go buy some 2/3 SER cable? good for 90 amps, or some 4/3 SER cable good for 65 amps. that wire is not that expensive.
  11. Speedy Petey

    Speedy Petey Licensed Electrical Contractor

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    MAN, the 2008 NEC SUCKS!
  12. Speedy Petey

    Speedy Petey Licensed Electrical Contractor

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    +1 .............
  13. Chris75

    Chris75 Electrician

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    Actually, # 4 would only be good for 55 amps under the 2008, glad we are not using it. :D
  14. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

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    To be specific, that ground wire does not carry an insulation rating which would allow you to use it for "hot" conductors. It may be perfectly fine, but it is not rated...so don't use it.
  15. Speedy Petey

    Speedy Petey Licensed Electrical Contractor

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    Oh, I thought you were referring to copper. :(
  16. Chris75

    Chris75 Electrician

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    No, sorry, my mistake for not specifying. Either way, i agree with your feelings toward the 2008 changes.
  17. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    Yes. I see, and that answers at least some questions I had. Thank you.

    I do not know what SER cable is, but I will find out and take a look. There is a very reputable supply house nearby where I can get a contractor's price through my employer.

    I did some homework on the auction wire and I believe it might be okay (including the temperature rating) if the conduit is sized properly and I color-code the four strands, but I will not likely spend the time to first be absolutely certain about all of that unless cost becomes a really big issue.

    Thank you.
  18. Chris75

    Chris75 Electrician

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    This is SER type cable
    http://www.southwire.com/ProductCatalog/XTEInterfaceServlet?contentKey=prodcatsheet273


    Unless that "free wire" is a Chapter 3 wiring method forget about it.
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2008
  19. leejosepho

    leejosepho DIY scratch-pad engineer

    What "free wire", and Chapter 3 of what?

    Question: If I use the SER wire you mentioned, would I still have to run it in conduit?
  20. jwelectric

    jwelectric Electrical Contractor/Instructor

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    No but you would have to install a messenger wire to support the cable from being pulled on with added weight such as the wind or ice.

    EDITED TO ADD;

    Just though about something and wanted to be clear on the fact that SE-R cable can not be installed underground with or without conduit.
    338.12 Uses Not Permitted.
    (A) Service-Entrance Cable. Service-entrance cable (SE) shall not be used under the following conditions or in the following locations:
    (1) Where subject to physical damage unless protected in accordance with 230.50(A)
    (2) Underground with or without a raceway
    Last edited: Oct 12, 2008
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