Bradford White MI403S6FBN

Discussion in 'Plumbing Forum, Professional & DIY Advice' started by Regdhy, Nov 18, 2012.

  1. Regdhy

    Regdhy New Member

    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    We recently purchased the above 40 gallon water heater. We were charged $800. I did not see it until after installation. It sits so low to the ground (much lower than its predesessor) that I am concerned if we get water in the basement, it would not take much for the water to get inside the unit. I think it would take a minuscule amount of water to wreck the water heater. Is this correct? The installer wants to charge $200 to place bricks under the newly installed water heater to raise it up some and reconnect it. I wish the installer would have asked us before installation about the wisdom of raising it. Although we rarely get water in the basement, it is a worry. Should we pay more to lift the water heater?
  2. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,831
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    I always install the heater on the ground, but then we have few basements here. As a practical matter, if the water gets high enough to "damage" the heater where it is, it would probably also get high enough to damage it if it were a couple of inches higher. The water would have to get high enough to enter the air inlets on the back of the heater, because the combustion chamber "door" is sealed.
  3. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    All WH are made that way now. They needed to maintain approximately same overall height, with new larger "techy" burner compartment.
  4. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,139
    Location:
    New England
    The critical thing on a WH is the gas valve...if that gets submerged, the valve MUST be replaced. The valve itself may end up being higher or at the same height as the bottom of the tank on your old one. The new ones are required to have protection from igniting flamable vapors.
  5. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,831
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    quote; The critical thing on a WH is the gas valve

    The critical thing is "when does the gas burner get submerged", because at that point the system has to be disassembled and all the water removed from it.
  6. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,139
    Location:
    New England
    You can recover from a submerged burner, you should NOT try to use a gas valve that has been submerged...that was my point.
  7. jimbo

    jimbo Plumber

    Messages:
    8,997
    Location:
    San Diego
    As far as I know, no manufacturer will authorize any repair of a WH which has been submerged up to the gas valve.
  8. hj

    hj Moderator & Master Plumber Staff Member

    Messages:
    26,831
    Location:
    Cave Creek, Arizona
    My point is that the cost of repairing the FVIR system on any water heater where some of the components have been submerged could make it uneconomical to do it, nor would I give any guarantee on the future operation of the water heater if a customer insisted on it being repaired. Meaning, that I probably would not do it. I am not sure that $200.00 would be enough to raise it because it would need to be drained and some piping might have to be revised, depending on how it was connected.
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