Basement Bathroom Remodel with neo-angle shower pan

Discussion in 'Shower & bathtub Forum & Blog' started by jdieter, Apr 6, 2014.

  1. jdieter

    jdieter New Member

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Maryland
    I'm ok with code venting requirements, but couldn't find anything about burying the p-trap under the pan and under the newly poured concrete I had to bust out to do the rough-in. If I moved the trap away from the shower strainer to have access to it I'd have a 3.5' straight run, which seems like a bad plan. How should I proceed?

    Also a new subfloor will be installed being, 1/2 ESP rigid foam and 3/4T&G OSB. There is a floor drain in the bathroom I would like to eliminate, If I got enough water to make it to the drain, it would also be running out the patio doors (a walkout basement) and the osb would be trashed anyway. I have good gutters, drained window wells, an exterior perimeter drain, and being built on a hillside it is graded so rainwater is diverted around the foundation, the basement has never had water in it in the 17 years we've been here. Is there an acceptable method to cap the floor drain besides doing more concrete demo and capping off the drain pipe?
  2. cacher_chick

    cacher_chick Test, Don't Guess!

    Messages:
    3,246
    Location:
    Land of Cheese
    The shower drain should always drop vertically into the trap, there is no other correct way to do it.

    The simplest way to deal with the floor drain would be to plug it with an expanding test plug that fits in below the level of the floor.
  3. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,009
    Location:
    New England
    There are ways to make the entire bathroom floor waterproof, so that might be an option. A floor drain may be code where you are, so don't just take it out unless you find out. It should have a trap primer going to it to keep the trap full as well.

    On a 2" drain pipe, the vent must be within 5', so that seems okay with what you stated. By far, the best place for the trap is directly underneath the drain.
  4. johnfrwhipple

    johnfrwhipple Bathroom Design & Build - North Vancouver, B.C.

    Messages:
    4,156
    Location:
    North Vancouver, BC
    Some Neo Angle Shower Ideas.

    A few showers I helped build

    [​IMG]
    No-Curb Shower

    [​IMG]
    Low Curb Shower
  5. jdieter

    jdieter New Member

    Messages:
    16
    Location:
    Maryland
    Thanks for the replies, I placed the trap directly under the drain with a vent T after that, so if I ever need to clean the trap it will be though the drain. The house was built in the early 70's and none of the traps have a vent so I'm correcting that as I go, the only vent in the system was a 1.5" pipe off an elbow below a closet flange from the upstairs bath. The original owner built a two seater upstairs bath, 2 toilets, one on each side of the tub. Everything is cast iron and steel which I'm also replacing. The two toilets drain into a sanitary T which then drains into the soil stack at close to a 45dg. angle, is that a common practice for toilets I should replicate or stay closer the 1/4" min./ft ? Also concerning the only current system vent, the 1.5" that is plumbed out one of the elbows below the closet flange, should I leave this vent intact, even though I'm going to carry the new plastic 4" soil stack up through the roof to catch all the vents I'll be adding? The drains for the two seater upstair bath will remain in the same location. I guess another way I should ask that question; is a vent necessary for the toilets beside the 4" soil stack going through the roof?
  6. johnfrwhipple

    johnfrwhipple Bathroom Design & Build - North Vancouver, B.C.

    Messages:
    4,156
    Location:
    North Vancouver, BC
    Another good question for the plumbers here. Sorry.

    As I understand it a 3" shower drain line (we use them on occasion as back ups for our curbless showers) do not need to be vented. I would reason that a 4" line would be the same.

    There is a lot of schooling and a lot of variables in these calculations. If you want a better answer - ask a better question. By this I mean you should prepare a simple sketch of the entire home showing all plumbing fixtures. Only then can the plumbers work out the venting requirements properly...

    JW
  7. dhagin

    dhagin builder:anti-builder

    Messages:
    108
    Location:
    oahu
    All traps need vents. The important question is: how far from the toilet is the vent stack? :)
  8. jadnashua

    jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx

    Messages:
    22,009
    Location:
    New England
    There are situations where the toilet can be 'wet vented'. The biggest issue with a toilet is that it dumps a decent amount of water in a very short time...the toilet generally will give other traps problems...sucking a toilet dry is harder to do. When allowed, wet venting can only be done on a single bathroom group, and never between floors. Things can generally drain perfectly fine without a vent at all, but it becomes a problem for other things downstream trying to maintain their water seal in their traps as that waste goes by their trap arm if they aren't vented.
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