Advice with well pump replacement cost

Discussion in 'Pumps and Tanks Well Forum & Blog' started by scotworthy, Aug 22, 2005.

  1. scotworthy

    scotworthy New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Greetings all,

    My well pump went out this week and I need to have it replaced. It's 280ft deep. I have a quote for a new Gould pump (1.5hp) and controller @ $1200.00 and labor @ $150/hr. Does this sound like it's in the ball park or should I shop around. Any input is appreciated, thanks.

    Scott
  2. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
    4,540
    Location:
    Riverview, Fl.
    I would think that is in the ballpark Scott. The gallon per minute of the pump has a lot to do with the price. The smaller number the more it costs. As in 5 gallon per minute is much more than a 20 gallon per minute pump.

    Our swap out price on a 1hp 20 gallon per minute here in Florida is $1195.00. This price includes the rig labor, submersible pump cable and the pump of coarse. The pumps here are hung anywhere from 21' to 168'.

    bob...
  3. scotworthy

    scotworthy New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Bob, thanks for the reply. I'm looking at a 10gpm pump. Your deal sounds alot more affordable than what I'm seeing here in Washington. My quote so far is looking like:
    pump & controller = $1200
    Labor $150/hr*5hrs = $750
    plus misc fittings, well seal, wire....
    I could be looking at $2000 - $3000
    Thanks again,

    Scott
  4. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    Why such a large pump for only 260-270'? What's your elevation above sea level?

    Here in PA someone suggesting pricing the job that way might be shot!! Just joking, but then it depends on how far out in da woods! The price for the pump is good, but $150/hr says your drop pipe must be on galvanized. Here it would be PE tubing or sch 80 PVC so we wouldn't need a derrick truck down to 500'. And we wouldn't replace the cable unless there was a proven need to. My pump puller machine sits on the top of the casing and hauls at 50'/minute from 500' or a max of 625 lbs..

    Gary
    Quality Water Associates
  5. scotworthy

    scotworthy New Member

    Messages:
    4
    We're at least 300' above sea level. Yes, the pipe is galvanized, house was built in 1969 so everythings getting old. We may replace the old piping while were at it. Cable is a drop in the bucket and we need to run a ground down to the motor anyway. Whoever did it before only ran three conductor wire down to the motor.

    Scott
  6. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
    4,540
    Location:
    Riverview, Fl.
    To make you feel better, a Myers 1.5hp 12 gallon per minute lists at just under $1200.00.

    I always replace the wire no matter what shape it's in, cheap insurance. What I might question is the 5 hours. With a pump hoist properly equipped it shouldn't take that long. If he replaces the pipe all the way down with new galvanized that would seem more realistic. I stack galvanized pipe up through a hoop at the top of my boom at 42 feet. This way we only have to disassemble every other joint. And we don't lay the pipe down in the grass where the dogs have been doing... well you know. Makes the job go much faster. I guess that's why we don't charge by the hour for small pumps.

    bob...
  7. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    The effect of elevation above sea level is to increase the hp but, it is based on 1000' increments.

    One way to decrease the cost of your replacing the old galvanized is to go with PE or PVC. There's a PVC system that is very easy to assemble and disassemble without threadign or cementing, it's called Shur-A-Lock by Modern Products Industries.

    http://www.shur-a-lock.com/

    Gary
    Quality Water Associates
  8. scotworthy

    scotworthy New Member

    Messages:
    4
    Bob and Gary,

    Thanks very much for all your input. Today the new pump goes in. If the galvanized pipe looks bad, we'll be replacing it with PE or PVC. Once it all up and running again, I'm going pump water like there's no tomorrow. :)

    Scott
  9. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    I suggest replacing the galvanized regardless. It causes iron in the water and clogs up over time.

    Gary
    Quality Water Associates
  10. mikelectric

    mikelectric New Member

    Messages:
    2
    To Speedbump Bob, I am new and see all your posts, thus ask with humility for clarification befitting a child: I am confused by the cost arithmetic. Why would a pump which uses more power to pump more water, thus with a bigger number, let's say 100 gpm, be cheaper than a pump with a smaller number, let's say one gpm?
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2008
  11. mikelectric

    mikelectric New Member

    Messages:
    2
    To Scotworthy, The National Electric Code Nomenclature for cable includes only the conductors, not the ground. So if you say you have 3-wire cable it means 3 wires plus a ground cable. Even if you had a total of three wires you could run either 120 volts or 240 volts two pole on two wires and use the third wire as the ground. The only alternative I can think of is if you have three phase power to your pump, in which case, yes, you would need a fourth wire.
  12. Bob NH

    Bob NH In the Trades

    Messages:
    3,317
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    A 3-wire motor with a controller requires 3 wires + ground to the motor. A 2-wire motor (available up to 1.5 HP) requires 2 wires + ground.

    Old installations didn't require a ground so none was installed. A new pump requires a new cable with ground.

    The issue of "smaller gpm costs more" applies only to pumps of the same horsepower. A 5 GPM pump requires less HP per stage than a 20 GPM pump. Therefore, if you have enough stages to require a 1.5 HP motor you have more stages with a 1.5 HP 5 GPM pump. You could have 3 to 4 times the stages of a 1.5 HP 20 GPM pump (and it would deliver a lot more pressure or head).

    More stages cost more money so a 1.5 HP 5 GPM pump costs more than a 1.5 HP 20 GPM pump.

    That condition applies to pumps with substantially the same housing diameter. If you have large differences in capacity (your 1 GPM to 100 GPM example) it may not always apply.
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2008
  13. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
    4,540
    Location:
    Riverview, Fl.
    BobNH pretty well cleared that one up for me.

    The 5gpm simply has more impellers than the 20 gpm, thus costing more. Same Motor, just more Impellers.

    bob...
  14. Leaky Boot

    Leaky Boot New Member

    Messages:
    31
    Prices

    New 1 hp 10 gpm Goulds, installed on your pipe and cable $995 plus tax. Includes labor. Need new pipe? Sch 80 Eagle Brand PVC, add .70 per ft. Couplings $1 each. Cable for the Goulds 2 wire pump---add another .70 ft. Goulds will have a Franklin Motor. LB
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2008
  15. redracer999

    redracer999 New Member

    Messages:
    2
    I am looking at a 1/2hp 3 wire submersible pump for my 100ft well. My local contractor is wanting $1700 for the job. Another told me they wouldn't do it for less than $1500. They replaced the check valve on the pump a few months ago and it took them no more than 2 hrs. I have priced pumps and they seem to run around $600. From what I understand there is nothing special about my set up. It has the soft black plastic pipe that is in good shape, the wireing is good and it has a crowes foot connection. Am I missing something that a company could charge $500 an hour for labor for this job?
    Last edited: May 26, 2009
  16. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
    4,540
    Location:
    Riverview, Fl.
    First of all, I like two wire motors better than three wire motors. A pump man that uses three wire motors is not educated in the fact that two wire motors outlast three wire motors.

    He does seem a little bit high, but if he replaced the check valve, why didn't he just replace the whole pump then instead of double dipping.

    We get around $1395.00 to swap out a 1/2hp sub and we include new wire from top to bottom.
  17. valveman

    valveman Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    4,579
    Location:
    Lubbock, Texas
    Hey I like 3 wire motors. I think they have better starting torque in areas with sand in the water. Here we have more problems with 2 wire motors. I think it is a matter of which area you are in, and personal preference.
  18. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
    4,540
    Location:
    Riverview, Fl.
    But three wire motors have a biac switch which will reverse the start direction back and forth to try and dislodge the stuck motor/pump. The three wire won't do that.

    We don't have enough sandy wells in our area to really give them a good test. We only have a few shoddy drillers that cheap out on casing that usually ends up in a sandy well.
  19. Gary Slusser

    Gary Slusser That's all folks!

    I'm sure Bob meant to type, But TWO wire motors have a biac switch

    I like 2 wire pumps also, they keep the cost down, 2 wire + ground versus 3 wire + ground cable and the control box cost and a 2 wire reduces the number of parts and potential failure in the control box of a 3 wire pump. And if sand is a problem, buy a pump that is designed to last longer with sand than a regular pump.
  20. speedbump

    speedbump Previous member

    Messages:
    4,540
    Location:
    Riverview, Fl.
    Yup, sure did. Thanks Gary for catching that.
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